IGEA Celebrates International Women and Gender Diverse Day 2024

08
Mar

The theme for International Women’s Day 2024 is “Invest in women: Accelerate progress”.

Each year IGEA likes to celebrate and expand upon International Women’s Day, branching out to include gender diverse people to recognise that marginalisation that occurs across many genders.  This year to mark the occasion, we are celebrating women and gender diverse people in our membership, working across all areas of the local video games industry by profiling them on our website.

We think it’s important to showcase the people behind the products and also the types of roles available in the industry with a view to inspire the next generation of women and gender diverse people considering a career in games.

We intend for this to be a living resource that we will update regularly and potentially expand.

In the spirit of inclusion this is open to women both cis and trans, as well as gender diverse people.

Additionally, we have seen some amazing statistics coming out of Australia regarding gender diversity, both in who makes games and who plays them.

To download a PDF of this infographic to use or print, click here.

If you have any questions or would like to get involved, please reach out to Sav (sav@igea.net) or Raelene (raelene@igea.net). Otherwise, please read on for our showcase!


Liz Ballantyne

Tell us about your job:

Everyday I work with our crazy-talented team, encouraging new ideas and processes to make games that not only look good but feel good too. How we make games is just as important to me as the games we make – ensuring our team feels supported, with space to create and confidence to share ideas, big, small, and out of this world!

I also mentor on various programs, from students to leads, and serve as an industry representative on the QUT Industry Advisory Board for Games and IT and the Screen Queensland Equity and Diversity Taskforce. Fostering and supporting diverse talent to not only survive but thrive!

Why Games?

I remember spending hours as a kid creating art and music in Mario Paint on the SNES! The little mouse trackpad, combined with the playful Mario-themed sprites, had me hooked! Years later, I started working as a Graphic Designer, and after graduating, I found my way to the wonderful world of games. But I often think of Mario Paint as a gentle nudge in the right direction!

The playfulness of games in their creation is what has stayed with me and what I enjoy the most. Having friends to make and play games with is pretty great too!

What is your favourite game?

Little Big Planet


Molly Campbell

Tell us about your job:

Well, I write a lot of emails! At IGEA, I am responsible for the organisational operations of the company as well as assisting with webinars, GCAP, AGDAs and all other events that IGEA hosts. My average day consists of meetings and task tackling and no two days are the same. I’m lucky to be in my position at IGEA because every enquiry we get is unique and exciting. I learn more and more about Industry everyday and enjoy meeting our members across Australia and New Zealand.

Why Games?

Video Games were a big part of my childhood. I have so many fond memories repeatedly playing CTR with my family and giggling every time my parents hit a wall. Games bring so much joy to households and this industry is so diverse and vast, that I have loved meeting those who make and play games. Turns out, it’s everyone!

What is your favourite game?

Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back


Riley Hanlin

Tell us about your job:

I have the awesome job of creating 3D environments for our studio. Whether it’s a crafting bench, a collection of plants or even a cosy building for one of our characters, I’m on it. My day is always a little bit different depending on what I’m working on, but the process usually starts with collecting reference images and then formulating a prototype model in Maya for the team to look at. Once a model has been approved, I polish it all up, texture it in Substance and Photoshop, then set it up in Unity, ready for the programmers!

But that’s just the pipeline for model creation. I also spend a lot of time reading through our character bios and thinking of ways I can tell stories through the pieces that I’m making, giving them as much personality as I can. I’m never working on one thing for too long though – you wear many hats in an indie studio! There’s plenty of jobs to do in Unity like creating collision, navigation meshes and foliage wind effects. I even got to make outfits for our main character, as well as a duck! I have too many programs and internet tabs open every day!

Why Games?

I always knew I wanted to make games! Games have played a huge role in my life. As kids my brother and I would sit in front of the telly with our consoles for hours, coming up with our own games-within-games or even just playing the same demos on discs over and over again. We often had game nights where the whole family would bicker over Mario Kart, laugh at You Don’t Know Jack and make endless notes for puzzles in The Neverhood. Games really bring everyone together!

I also drew a lot as a kid. I was constantly creating characters and creatures, making up the worlds they lived in, what magical powers they had. I did think I’d go into character design but when I got my hands on 3D at 17 there was no turning back. I fell in love with environments. The fact that I could create my own worlds felt so exhilarating—there’s limitless potential for creativity in games. There’s always been something so special and magical about exploring a new world for the first time and I love that I can create that experience for others.

What is your favourite game?

The Neverhood


Kylee Kay

Tell us about your job:

The life of a CEO of a VR game Development company is certainly never boring. Though it probably sounds much more fun that it really is. It all depends on who you ask of course. Business for me is fun and I suppose my job is to run the business of the studio, not make the games. I spend a lot of my time dealing with staff and processes, finances and legalities. There are never any guarantees of success when making games so it is a high risk industry filled with extremely talented people.

My job is to bring the talent together to create something the market hasn’t seen ideally that makes it commercially viable and for us at Toast, presents also with a social conscience. Games that are entertaining and impactful with underlying or subliminal messaging that speak to broad ranges of people. No one day is the same. Lots of meetings, lots of discussion and collaboration. Lots of navigating new technology still really in its infancy and certainly not having yet reached critical mass .

To summarise, I’m responsible for managing Toast’s business operations and upholding our values of inclusivity and diversity. Ultimately, I am responsible for the resourcing, production and successful release of our titles in production and positioning the business for ongoing success and value post-release of each.

This includes responsibility for marketing, production, finance, legals etc. – The buck stops here!

Why Games?

Life is about fun and experiences. I have travelled the world and still love to but when Covid hit the world stood still. Except for gaming! It’s a long story of how I came to be where I am, but I am now convinced that gaming came to me – for my son. He has ADHD but absolutely loves to play games and loves VR (in small doses of course). He has a design focused mind and all that I have learnt and continue to learn around gaming I store for when he is old enough to want to know more. He is only 7 so a bit young to make games… yet. I had an Atari when i was a kid. Yes, frogger was a hit. It has been such a joy to watch game development evolve and to be part of that now is simply extraordinary.

What is your favourite game?

Pacman of course. I’m old school and it brings back so many innocent childhood memories.


Jane Kennington

Tell us about your job:

As Game Director, I’m overseeing and constantly re-evaluating the production and timelines of our game, Incolatus, to make sure it hits marketing beats and can be released on time. In the dev sense, I’m playing the game every day with every change that is made and evaluating the ‘fun’ factor, suggesting and debating changes and improvements to the core loop with the team. On the business side, I’m applying for grants, talking with publishers, and having weekly meetings with our marketing manager to make sure we’re getting our name out there.

As 3D Generalist, which is my other main job, I’m creating and rigging 3D models, UV mapping, creating textures and materials for them, designing levels and environments and bringing the whole visual aesthetic together.

I like to say that I do everything except for programming and music. As a new studio working on our first project; if there’s something that needs to get done, I’ll find a way. This includes odd jobs like graphic design, website design, UI design, writing dialogue, video editing, sound effect creation, presskit creation, voice acting, font creation, occasional bug fixes etc etc. While I would like to have a dedicated person for all these jobs, of course, we all know the idea ‘we wear many hats in Indie.’ That’s how it is at the moment.

Outside of Funny Fintan Softworks I’m the Vice Chair of the WA Games Industry Council (name change pending from Let’s Make Games) which means I oversee and am involved with many matters affecting the local industry, at the moment I’m collaborating with a local anime/art themed convention to get our local games on display, it’s all about supporting the games projects coming out of WA.

Why Games?

I actually kind of fell into it. My original interest was in film and CGI, which led me to learning effects and 3D programs. In year 10, I was in a project management class and assigned the task ‘create a project that you can manage over time.’ My friend asked if we could create a videogame, I said ‘I don’t know.’ So we googled it. Turns out my skills in CG and film helped get us a start.

I didn’t initially care too much for the project, until I played Doom 2016 for the first time and then Eternal the week it came out. I was like ‘This is the best thing I’ve ever played, why isn’t the art style and world of Destiny made into a gameplay loop like this.’ Thus the original idea for our mix of gameplay and art styles. Now there was a game I WANTED to make.

The idea from the teacher was that we’d be managing the project over the course of that year, but we ended up making a 3-year plan for a videogame that we could take to publishers/screen agencies to get a job. That wasn’t the original intention, but it’s one that grew after months and years of iteration, realising we had a real shot of turning this into a career.

Turns out it worked! In our fifth year of production, I’m the only one left from that original student team, but people drift apart in life and have different priorities.

What is your favourite game?

Doom Eternal


Raelene Knowles

Tell us about your job:

I’ve been working in games for longer than I care to remember. I love working at IGEA and it’s an honor to be a part of this vibrant and creative industry and be constantly inspired by all of our community and stakeholders My role is to ensure we provide value for members and the broader industry through the provision of services and projects across our 4 main pillars – Advocate, Educate, Create and Celebrate.

I look after our events, our research projects, our communications and am across all of our member services. My days are varied and interesting and whilst some of the projects seem the same when we deliver them annually, they are always different due to the nature of working in a dynamic industry.

Why Games?

I love the opportunity to engage with so many different stakeholders both internally and externally to IGEA to highlight the power of games. When I started almost 15 years ago, we had a couple of issues under management – now we probably have 12+, alongside many other deliverables. The work is interesting, sometimes very challenging and I’ve loved to see our industry grow, our membership grow and of course our team grow as well. The people we represent are great people and the work they produce is inspiring.

What is your favourite game?

Don’t judge – Rollercoaster Tycoon.


Skye Lavelle

Tell us about your job:

I’m typically bouncing between art and marketing tasks throughout the day – one minute I’m making menu concepts and the next I’ll be writing a newsletter. I’m responsible for creating design briefs or concepting new ideas for our small team, but also updating our socials and making new marketing materials.

I just love the process of creating, regardless of whether it resides inside or outside the game! As someone still new to the industry, I really enjoy pushing myself to learn two disciplines and how they complement each other!

Why Games?

I’ve always been drawn to games. To me, videogames are the ultimate storytelling device, an infinite source to explores narratives through so many different visual and interactive experiences. And as an artist it’s just a perfectly endless way to develop new styles and skillsets.

Plus with my ever-increasing love for immersive sims, the more I play, the more I appreciate game development and become inspired to see how much I can grow!

What is your favourite game?

Prey (2017)


Michela Ledwidge

Tell us about your job:

Running Mod means juggling art, science and business and there’s no average day. Too many hats. On a good day I’ve got a finely balanced diet of research, time on the tools experimenting, adding features or tweaking while trying not to break things, playtesting builds, running our all-important standup meeting, and trying to stay connected to the wider world who enable and help us do what we do.

Why Games?

I’ve been making games and tools since the Commodore 64 but it’s only been relatively recently that the kind of cinematic interactive entertainment I dreamed of has become a creative and commercial reality. “Game” is a such a convenient short hand for interactive and immersive entertainment more broadly. There are easier ways to make a living but there’s so much satisfaction in the process of crafting something new. There aren’t many areas of life where all my interests converge like this and I feel very lucky to run a true indie. My favourite part of the gig is getting stuff made and into the hands of people who enjoy it.

What is your favourite game?

The Last Of Us


Caitlin Lomax

Tell us about your job:

Running my own studio I get to put so many different hats on! Most of the time I’ve got my Producer hat on and I’m wrangling Jira tickets, chasing deliverables, milestone reports, pitch decks and checking builds. The cool thing about the way we do things is that I get to be across a few projects at once. I love the challenge of understanding the different ways each team is working and planning out the dependencies between all the tasks and resources.

Alot of our projects are using emerging technology and I get to use my programming background to create R&D plans & build prototypes of things that not many people are doing yet, it’s really exciting!

Why Games?

Christmas 2000 – My sister and I got beanbags and a Playstation 1. I think we played a mix of Crash Bandicoot and Mary Kate & Ashley’s Magical Mystery Mall non-stop until we had to go back to school. I knew I loved games but I grew up in a regional town in WA where there was nowhere to learn to make games. It wasn’t until I was 13 and my addiction to The Sims was out of control that my Dad got me a book, “Game Programming for Teens”. I had to earn time on The Sims by spending time learning to code. I just got addicted to learning to code instead! I never pursued programming professionally, but the knowledge came in really handy to get my first job in games as a Producer. I love how there’s so much to consider when making a game across so many different skillsets and the collaboration that it takes.

What is your favourite game?

Bust-a-groove


Kiera Lord

Tell us about your job:

I’m pretty socially focused for a programmer. Usually I’d start a morning by wrapping up whatever I had left over from the day before and then check in with whoever’s using whatever I’ve been working on recently to see if there’s anything that needs changing or fixing.

My favorite thing is getting problems where I can deep dive and learn new things. These happen occasionally but it’s great fun digging deep into systems or engines and finding out why something works the way it does.

Why Games?

Honestly there really wasn’t a choice. I was one of those kids who at age 9 discovered programming, decided I wanted to make games and everything else was a straight line from there. It was a hobby from childhood and then a job from 2005 onwards.

I’ve done a few games adjacent jobs of the years but it’s never been the same. I know it’s not for everyone, but for me… I’ve never found anything else as satisfying or rewarding as working on games.

What is your favourite game?

Neverwinter Nights


Emma McCaw

Tell us about your job:

As a QA Analyst, I test game functionality as well as reproduce and document defects found within software to ensure they meet the user’s needs and the client’s requirements. I design and maintain documentation to ensure adequate test coverage and consistency for the developing product.

Why Games?

I love the intricacies of game testing and development. Games are a way for people to escape reality, engage in fun activities alone or with friends, and use the space to look after their mental health. Games allow players to forge their own experiences at their own pace and learn new life skills or improve overall knowledge. This is what makes games fascinating, and I love being a part of this unique medium. One of the things I love about my job as a QA Analyst is having the opportunity to detect and report experience-altering defects before they reach the end user.

What is your favourite game?

That is a tough question to answer as I have too many favourite games. But a game that I will always return to is The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim. I love Skyrim for its vast, explorable map, hidden secrets, fun gameplay mechanics, dragons, intriguing narrative, and never-ending replayability.


Zoe McNeany

Tell us about your job:

Being an Environment Artist is about visually bringing the world of the game to life!

In my role I undertake a lot of different tasks encompassing Technical and Creative skillsets. This can include Modelling Terrain and Prop Assets, Creating Textures and Sculpting High Poly Models to optimizing models and troubleshooting technical issues with assets in the game. I love the blend of creative and technical thinking needed for this role.

In my role as an Environment Artist I also utilize the assets that the whole art team has crafted and arrange them in the Environment.
This Usually starts from updating the LD Grey-box Block out to a fully realized environment scene, all the way to polishing the fine details of the Environment, including adding lighting in order to help guide the player and set the mood of the environment.

Environment Art is all about Enriching the players experience of the world and helping to support the gameplay through design and visual storytelling!

Why Games?

I have always loved playing games and am lucky to share the hobby with a lot of my family. As a kid I loved playing Zelda with my Mum and Sister, Crash Team Racing with my Dad and Gauntlet legends with my Grandma. I have always loved being creative and used to fill my notebooks at school with drawings and stories.

When Spirited Away was released I was decided I wanted to become an animator, I was inspired by the Story, Art and World crafted for the movie and decided to pursue studying animation after I left school. Whilst attending Uni for Animation I was introduced properly to 3D software and found that I loved creating in 3D!

I love the power that Games have to transport you into a story and world and let you shape the experience you have within that world. As an Environment Artist I love composing worlds for people to enjoy and embedding little stories into each environment and Prop I create.

What is your favourite game?

Mass Effect 2 / Zelda: Ocarina Of Time


Lucy Mutimer

Tell us about your job:

I’m one of those tremendously lucky individuals who gets to work on two different sides of game development.

Half of my work week I work as a freelance artist for the video games industry. This means that teams and studios pull me in to do everything from in-game assets, animations, and User-Interface design to concept art and art direction. Sometimes I’m the only arty person on the team and other times I work with art teams full of talented people. Every project is different and I feel incredibly privileged to have had my hands in as many baskets as I’ve had. Some people I’ve worked with include Normal Wholesome Games and Lumi.

When I’m not slinging art for clients or yelling at art programs, you can find me using my gift of the gab to work as a talent agent for Supaglu. Supaglu is an agency that specialises in the VFX, Animation and Video games Industry helping tremendously talented people find incredible studios to call work-home. My role has me chatting to game developers and studios and helping them find employment and freelancers for projects. While this role is new to me, I have found it rewarding chatting to everyone about why they love what they do and what their ideal person or role looks like.

Why Games?

I never set out to have games be my career. Really early on, I had the impression that working in the games industry was something reserved for cool, but mostly silent older brothers of friends who wore Nine Inch Nails shirts and moved to America to work. I was pleasantly surprised to find that this wasn’t the case, and after a stint in graphic design, I found my footing here. I stay in the games industry because I don’t think there’s anything else quite like it. We smoosh creativity and code together to make interactive stories for people, and I think that’s something very special. It’s one of the most creatively fulfilling industries I could be part of.

What is your favourite game?

I’ll give you three: Dragon Age Inquisition, The Sims 2, and Baldur’s Gate 3


Kayla Panozzo

Tell us about your job:

At Riot Games Sydney, I manage a team of ~7 developers who create exciting new features for Valorant. Most of my job is making their lives as easy as possible. Normally that is brainstorming ways to solve hard technical problems, pushing for product decision to be made in meetings and sometimes even writing code. I just love being able to enable game developers to create their best work and work closely with the US Valorant teams to make it the best game for players that it can be.

One part of my job I enjoy is solving hard problems. The games industry provides very unique but challenging problems – everything has to scale to millions of concurrent users and sometimes thing are very subjective (e.g. something just doesn’t feel right). This means that I am always faced with new challenges to try and solve and it keeps life interesting. On top of that people management adds another level of complexity to my work. Everybody has different experiences and react to different scenarios in unique ways. Working through this with people and helping people grow is very rewarding. I really want everyone to enjoy their job and be the best they can be and I am privileged to help people do that everyday.

Why Games?

Games are a great way to make new friends, be creative or help you get through a hard time. I love being able to make something that is such a big part of people’s lives and games have helped me many times when I just needed to escape from the hardships that life throws your way. On top of that, games have always been a big part of my life – it was a way for me to connect with my family and friends. As a child, at every family barbeque you could find me and my cousins playing Spyro, Kingdom Hearts, Crash Bash or Guitar Hero. Now that I work in games, I pretty much live, breathe and sleep games. I play Valorant at work, cozy games after work and then cooperative games on the weekend with friends. So once I left the finance industry and was looking for a different industry to move to, games was the obvious choice and I was just luckily enough to join the Australian games industry. I am very excited to see the industry grow so that more people have the chance to join us.

What is your favourite game?

Spyro 2: Gateway To Glimmer


Kirsty Parkin

Tell us about your job:

I run Supaglu, an employment agency specifically for the games, VFX and animation industry in Australia. Together with my amazing team, I work to help our studio clients find the best Australian talent, with the right skills and experience, to help them complete their projects and build their businesses. We work with studios all over Australia, and find freelance and permanent/contract staff. For example, we find work for experienced 2D and 3D artists, tech and VFX artists, production staff, developers and engineers, game designers and also associated support roles like marketing people and business development leads. We also work in “games adjacent’ industries – industries that might need the skills of people with a game development background. We also spend as much time as we can giving to the industry – attending and sponsoring events, and working to improve things for everyone as much as possible.

Why Games?

I’ve been playing games since the late 1980s. Our family bought a Commodore 128, and my brother got given a game called The Bard’s Tale. I was transfixed – there was, finally, a cartoon you could play, even if you had to type each command! I have never stopped playing RPGs, and later MMORPGS in all their various forms. I’ve worked in training, education and talent acquisition for many years – first in advertising and design in the 00’s, then in games and VFX in the teens. When I was a girl, I never believed it would be possible to work in the games industry. We’ve come a long way.

What is your favourite game?

Breath of the Wild. And also World of Warcraft, back in the day 🙂 And also all the Civilizations.


Kathy Smart

Tell us about your job:

Part of having a creative career is living with financial ups and downs. At present I teach part-time at SAE Creative Media Institute to fund my studio. I really enjoy supporting students as they grow so amazingly in their own creative lives, but I am always wanting to get back to making my own games.

When I am in my home studio I have to spend a disproportionate amount of time on admin, because social media and BAS statements still exist even for studios marking time while they build up capital.

My production work right now involves liaising with one totally blind QA tester in the US and another in Poland and one programmer working remotely, while we make my current game more accessible to players.

My creative work is when I have the best time, making small improvements to scenes in my current game in Unity. I get lost to the world, making sprites move, rotate and change size or colour, then saving the changes one way, checking them, saving them another way, checking them, and, you guessed it, building the game and checking them again. I work on characters, props, background cut-outs, UI buttons, sound, text, and menu settings. My next patch will be a big one. It will look much the same to players but will incorporate thousands of small changes.

I also attend Adelaide game developer events, which are bigger every year. We have the support of IGEA which has completely changed the landscape for game developers in Australia. I speak to so many indies who are aiming for ScreenAustralia funding, brought about by IGEA lobbying. I personally have used IGEA contract templates, and I benefited from IGEA mentoring.
So… back to the job!

Why Games?

I have a Masters in Creative Writing and I have written stories all my life. I have also played games all my life. I used to organise children’s parties, I have attended bridge tournaments, I was in the school chess club, my whole teen social set thrived on board games, I played Carmen Sandiago then Halo with the kids, and I had to take Microsoft games off my PC because I was playing them too much. However I had never thought to combine my two passions until I attended a seminar by Professor Christy Dena whom WritersSA brought down from Brisbane. Dr Dena showed us the powerful emotions that games can elicit and I was overwhelmed with ideas. I signed up to study game design at AIE and I’ve never looked back.

What is your favourite game?

My own game, of course! Frog’s Princess.


Jhenne Tyler

Tell us about your job:

A typical day for me involves lots of reading, even more writing, and thankfully not too much arithmetic (though I’ve fallen into the habit of creating lots of character and plot tracking timelines for future-me to reference.)

I’ve always enjoyed doing a little bit of everything when it comes to creative pursuits, and narrative design (especially at a studio of this size) is divinely aligned with my attention span. There’s a little of everything! One day could involve developing quests, character arcs, and penning dialogue, the next might focus on item descriptions, flavor text, and barks, or sitting in on and assisting with VO sessions, or clarifying in-script wordplay and puns for localization, or a million other micro-adventures.

Inter-team communication and collaboration is a constant; I ping-pong between the studio’s art, animation, and marketing peeps the most, and remain armed with plenty of moodboards for the ultimate visual learner vibe curation/story conveyance. (Sometimes, I end up simply marveling at the art– I file these moments under “inspiration-finding and brainstorming”.) After a successful outfit dubbing endeavor, I have also been giving the hilariously vague-yet-distinct task of “naming things”; if an in-game item needs a cute n’ cozy moniker, I’m your gal.

Basically, narrative design means donning whatever storytelling hat helps bring our game to life!

Why Games?

Naturally I grew up playing all manner of games (shoutout Super Mario 64 and my much beloved elementary school Oregon Trail days) but I slid into the gaming industry somewhat sideways; freelance TTRPG writing gigs and phone storage weighed down with mobile games turned into me wondering if my fav episodic story game was hiring. They were; I applied by harnessing the delicate balance of a serious business word-nerd résumé and a dorkily effusive cover letter promising curated ship playlists and a commitment to making players wail and/or squee as necessary, and ended up landing the position!

It’s a fantastic ride. I have a degree in Media Studies and had gotten used to looking at the medium from an analytical, academic perspective, so going from player to creator has been such a fun and fascinating experience. I’m grateful to have the chance to move the needle forward in terms of representation– I want to center stories and people that aren’t often under the spotlight– things I’d personally always hoped to see not just included, but highlighted and treated with care.

What is your favourite game?

Heavenly Sword (2007)


Megan Vasudevan

Tell us about your job:

As Marketing Coordinator, I oversee the SEO and Website Analytics for our brand. I also look into industry trends and news such as potential events to attend or people to connect with. On another note, I populate the website with blogs and infographics on game-related content. On a day-to-day basis, I shuffle between analytics, researching blog topics, making posts for social media, curating the monthly newsletter or any other work that comes across my desk.

Why Games?

This is my first job in the games industry, I was hired straight out of uni after finishing a master’s in marketing degree. I have always loved digital games starting very early on playing Pokemon on the Gameboy Advanced. Being able to work in the industry has given me a much broader perspective on what goes into games and the variety there is!

What is your favourite game?

Pokemon Emerald


Camille Woodthorpe

Tell us about your job:

As a (usually) solo developer I’ll wear many hats of game development – from programming, to art, to design, to marketing, and even some audio. Despite being experienced in managing Agile development teams, my own game projects are managed with simple priorities. Most of my day is comprised of doing hands-on development and programming in Unity or making pixel art in Aseprite. Being a solo developer is challenging in that the responsibility and ownership falls entirely on yourself, but that is also where you can take immense joy from your creations and where you take them!

Why Games?

I grew up playing games a lot with my 3 brothers, and was very creative from a young age – first, writing my own stories, then making pixel art in Microsoft Paint, then learnt Photoshop to do a lot of editing, all whilst playing and being inspired by games. Games was the perfect medium to practise all these areas of my creativity in the one place, in a medium which I loved. So I studied game development at Uni and have been doing it ever since.

What is your favourite game?

Tough question – maybe Pokemon Red on Gameboy or Zelda Oracle of Seasons


 

Diversi-tea: Safe in our World

07
Feb

Pop the kettle on to boil and get out the teacups, it’s time for another Diversi-tea.

Diversi-tea is a series of bite-sized lecture focused on diversity and inclusion within game culture and game development, featuring special guests from all backgrounds hosted by the Interactive Games and Entertainment Association (IGEA). This lecture will run for 50 minutes with a Q&A section for the last ten.

This tea features Sarah Sorrel and Sky Tunley-Stainton from Safe in our World, the mental health charity for the games industry focused on training, education, resources for DEI and healthy, safe work environments.

Come learn about Safe in our Worlds Level Up program, what training resources are available for use and how you can get involved with mental health in the games industry.

Access the slides here.

You can watch the recording here:

 

 

Sarah Sorrel:

Sarah (she/her) is the Charity Director for Safe In Our World.  She has extensive experience in the third sector for which she has worked for over 20 years as a Fundraiser, Marketeer and Communicator. Prior to Safe In Our World she worked in the sports sector where she developed mental wellbeing initiatives for young people to help them build mental toughness. She has always been an advocate for mental health and wellbeing, and truly understands how important is it to take mental health as seriously as physical health, especially in the workplace. She hopes with her dedication and passion to banish all stigma relating to mental health, and truly make it a natural topic of conversation, she will help drive the charity to achieve its aims and objectives.

Sky Tunley-Stainton:

Sky (they/them) is a neurodivergent (ADHD) person with a lifelong passion for video games. They have 8 years’ experience working in the cinema industry and a couple of years in government prior to joining Safe In Our World as Partnerships & Training Manager. Now, they run the charity’s Level Up Mental Health programme and training initiatives, working to support the global games industry in providing better resources for mental health and wellbeing. They were also the lead author of Sidekick: The Video Games Mental Health Journal, published in July 2023.

IGEA 2023 Year in Review

19
Dec

2023 has been a jam-packed year for the IGEA team and the Australian games industry. Some of the activities include the passing of DGTO legislation, Australia and New Zealand Plays, GCAP and the AGDAs  plus many, many other events, submissions, policies, trade missions, resources, and up-skilling programs.

We celebrate the release of the IGEA 2023 Year in Review – a snapshot of some of the work we did across 2023 and projected goals for 2024. Please enjoy these highlights and download the full document here: IGEA 2023 Year in Review.

We couldn’t achieve any of this without the support of our members, so thank you!

 

 

Aussie game developers pull in $345.5 million for local economy

18
Dec

Sydney, Australia, 18 December 2023 – Results released today show that revenue in the Australian video game industry has risen to $345.5 million, an increase of 21% over the past financial year. The results are part of the eighth annual Australian Game Developer Survey (AGDS), released by peak industry body, the Interactive Games & Entertainment Association (IGEA). The survey results are backed up by Australian consumer sales data released earlier this year, showing that Australians’ love for video games is reflected in the local industry.

51% of the 111 studios surveyed intend to utilise the Digital Games Tax Offset (DGTO) pending their eligibility, while 49% are already accessing some form of government funding. Many local studios will be looking to secure further funding made possible through government programs, such as the reinstated Australian Interactive Games Fund (AIGF) from Screen Australia, and boosts in games funding from Victoria and Queensland. As a direct result of federal and state-based government support, Australian studios are committing to the development of more projects, receiving increased interest from international businesses, and are predicting either income growth (68% of respondents) or income stability (21% of respondents) throughout the 2024 financial year.

“79% of studios have less than 20 employees, and nearly half of all studios (45%) have existed for less than five years, highlighting growth in independent and emerging businesses,” said Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA. “With continued government support to ensure success in our industry, we will likely see our younger studios turn into veterans – like the 32% of Australian studios that are 10 years or older today. We even have 63% of studios planning on hiring over this financial year, creating 200+ new jobs.”

“It is important to acknowledge that this is a challenging time for the industry and some studios are really feeling the effects. Funding and support must continue to ensure the long-term growth and success of the Australian industry so we can maintain the positive trajectory and continue contributing to the Australian economy and talent development.” Curry added.

The survey also revealed that Australian studios face ongoing challenges such as securing early-stage development funding, securing international publisher deals, and hiring specialised talent when local talent is hard to come by. To combat some of these issues, many studios have taken to working and hiring remotely to lower costs and unlock the potential of hiring interstate or international talent.

Despite the challenges, diversity in local studios is increasing with 26% of developers identifying as women and 5% identifying as trans, non-binary, or gender diverse.

“Our incredible local studios continue to perform on the global stage – 87% of our video game revenue comes from outside Australia into the local economy and 19% of our game developers who responded are receiving investment from overseas businesses. There is always potential for our local industry to grow sustainably, and thanks to the survey’s respondents we can now target the issues affecting local studios with renewed certainty and clarity.” said Curry.

You can download the report here

You can download the infographic here

 

ENDS

Media spokespeople available:

  • Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA
  • Jeffrey Brand, Professor at Bond University and author of the survey

Please contact igea@doublejump.com.au

 

About IGEA

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net.

 

About Australian Game Developer Survey

Our FY2023 game development survey is based on financial year data from 1 July 2022 – 30 June 2023. The survey was conducted by Bond University who supply responses in aggregate to IGEA. The survey opened in September 2023 and closed in the middle of November 2023. Participation in the survey is voluntary, with 111 studios completing the survey and providing usable data, which is slightly higher than the participation rate last year.

November 27 2023 – December 3 2023

08
Dec
  • 1

    Call of Duty: Modern Warfare III

    Activision

  • 2

    Hogwarts Legacy

    Warner Bros. Interactive

  • 3

    Super Mario Bros. Wonder

    Nintendo

  • 4

    EA Sports FC 24

    EA

  • 5

    Spider-Man 2

    Sony

  • 6

    Bluey: The Video Game

    Outright Games

  • 7

    Just Dance 2024

    Ubisoft

  • 8

    Let's Sing 2024

    Plaion

  • 9

    Mario Kart 8 Deluxe

    Nintendo

  • 10

    Horizon Zero Dawn

    Sony

November 27 2023 – December 3 2023

08
Dec
  • 1

    NBA 2K24

    Take 2

  • 2

    Grand Theft Auto V

    Take 2

  • 3

    Call of Duty: Modern Warfare III

    Activision

  • 4

    Red Dead Redemption 2

    Take 2

  • 5

    Spider-Man 2

    Sony

  • 6

    Lego 2K Drive

    Take 2

  • 7

    EA Sports FC 24

    EA

  • 8

    Hogwarts Legacy

    Warner Bros. Interactive

  • 9

    Red Dead Redemption

    Take 2

  • 10

    WWE 2K23

    Take 2

DGTO Webinar with the Office for the Arts: Check-In

23
Nov

We are checking in on the DGTO with the Office for the Arts! The DGTO has been live for a couple of months now.

We are checking in with the Office for the Arts on how things are going: What are things to avoid? What are some common mistakes they have seen now that the first applications have gone in?

This webinar is aimed at the whole industry, from seasoned veterans to aspirational newcomers. It also offered a robust Q&A.

You can watch a recording of the webinar here:

IGEA announces the winners of the 2023 Australian Game Development Awards (The AGDAs) 

04
Oct

Wednesday, 4 October 2023 – Tonight the Interactive Games and Entertainment Association (IGEA) announced the winners of the 2023 Australian Game Developer Awards at the Forum Melbourne. Receiving high praise from an expert panel of over 80 judges, Stray Gods: The Roleplaying Musical by Summerfall Studios not only took the coveted Game of the Year Award, but also the Excellence in Music and Accessibility Awards, exemplifying that great games are accessible to all players. The ambitious project features an all-star cast, and the judges felt the game set a benchmark for music design in games. 

 

Hosted by Good Game Spawn Point host Gemma Driscoll and ABC Gamer Loot Drop host Harry Jun, the AGDA’s award ceremony was held as part of Melbourne International Games Week (MIGW) and was the Grand Finale to the Game Connect Asia Pacific (GCAP) conference. The AGDAs highlight Australian creative and technical talent and shines a light on emerging developers and artists, whilst also showcasing the many successes of the local video game industry. 

 

“Stray Gods was a Herculean effort from all involved, and we are deeply grateful to receive this award, and to the Australian game development community for all the support over the years,” said Liam Esler, Managing Director and Co-Founder of Summerfall Studios. “We’re thrilled with the response to the game. Thank you to our publisher, Humble Games, as well as the judges for all their work, and congratulations to all of the winners tonight!” 

 

The AGDAs also feature a series of culture awards. This year The Studio of the Year was awarded to PlaySide Studios. From its foundation 12 years ago, PlaySide Studios is Australia’s largest publicly listed independent video game developer. It aims to foster a strong culture amongst its 260 staff working across its studios and remotely. Amongst several cultural initiatives, it runs a mentorship program, and has taken steps to ensure a diverse, inclusive and equitable workplace.  

 

This year’s Adam Lancman Award goes to Trent Kusters, Director and Co-Founder of League of Geeks (the 2020 Studio of the Year winner). Trent continuously goes above and beyond to raise other people up in the industry and support independent game makers. He is a fantastic force for good within the industry and a great ambassador for the Australian games industry locally and abroad. 

 

This year sees two recipients of The Empower Award. Dylan Bennett has been a catalyst for the growth and advancement of the video game industry in the Northern Territory by organising groups and events, sharing his own game development experience and is an advocate for the Northern Territory video game industry. Caitlin Lomax is a highly active member of the Western Australian Games community, organising the WA Games Week, writing the playbook for Screenwest to develop and fund the game development industry of the state, and personally training and educating teenagers and university students interested in games industry jobs amongst numerous other activities.  

 

Ryan Penning, the creator of Waypoint has made a significant impact on the Sydney game development community and is the recipient of this year’s Rising Star Award. Ryan’s dedication to providing a platform for emerging talent to showcase their projects is one of Ryan’s most significant contributions through Waypoint. He organises events that bring local developers and studios together, opening doors for aspiring game creators to present their work directly to industry professionals. 

 

Thanks to sponsorship from Creative Victoria, a MIGW Award was provided this year to a Victorian digital games studio.  Congratulations to  O’Sauraus Studios, who will receive mentorship, enterprise support, resources and connections to grow their business. 

 

“Congratulations to all the 2023 AGDAs winners, this is a time to celebrate your achievements and the incredible games you have worked so hard to release this year. Australia has an international reputation for creating high quality, diverse games, as this year’s awards have once again demonstrated. With the recent introduction of the Digital Games Tax Offset and continued Screen Australia support, the local video games industry will see more innovation, more investment, and more opportunities in the coming years. There has never been a better time to make games in Australia.” said Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA. 

 

Please see the full list of 2023 Australian Game Developer Award winners below. 

 

2023 AGDAs Winners 

 

Excellence in ART 

 

Excellence in GAMEPLAY 

 

Excellence in NARRATIVE 

 

Excellence in SOUND DESIGN 

 

Excellence in MUSIC 

 

Excellence in TECHNICAL DESIGN 

 

Excellence in ACCESSIBILITY 

 

Excellence in EMERGING GAMES 

 

Excellence in IMPACTFUL GAMES 

 

Excellence in MOBILE GAMES 

 

Excellence in AR/VR Games 

 

Excellence in ONGOING Games 

 

GAME OF THE YEAR 

 

 

 

Media spokespeople available: 

  • Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA 
  • Game Developers of award-winning games and studios on request 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS 

Felicia McEntire 

felicia@doublejump.com.au 

0455 143 650 

 

Paul Jones 

paul@doublejump.com.au 

0411 348 155 

 

About IGEA 

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net 

 

Unleash Your Potential as a Game Producer

06
Sep

Organa and IGEA have joined forces to deliver an Agile Game Producer Course.

It is aimed at junior and aspiring video game producers to develop and enhance the skills required in this crucial role but also more experienced producers who want to learn a modern and adaptive approach.

Developed by Agile and Lean experts who understand the unique challenges of the games development process, this course is your ultimate guide to becoming a competent leader in the industry.

We could not have done this without the input of these legendary module sponsors:



Together, these experts embody decades of experience and helped us shape this course into something highly relevant, applicable, and focused on closing crucial skills gaps. This course has been designed by industry for industry.

Dates and Duration

A practical, hands-on learning experience over 4 days, followed up by 4 knowledge sharing sessions, i.e., 22 hours overall.

Half-day learning workshops:

  • Monday, 30th Oct, 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm AEST
  • Monday, 6th Nov, 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm AEST
  • Monday, 13th Nov, 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm AEST
  • Monday, 20th Nov, 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm AEST



Virtual delivery (Zoom)

Post-course knowledge-sharing sessions:

  • Monday, 27th Nov, 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm AEST
  • Monday, 4th Dec, 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm AEST
  • Monday, 11th Dec, 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm AEST
  • Monday, 18th Dec, 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm AEST



Virtual delivery (Zoom)

Learn more here: Agile Games Producer Course

You can register for the course here: Registrations

IGEA members are eligible for a 20% discount. Please email jens@igea.net for details.

IGEA announces the 2023 Australian Game Development Awards Finalists

01
Sep

Friday, 1 September 2023The Interactive Games and Entertainment Association (IGEA) celebrates the finalists for the 2023 Australian Game Developer Awards (AGDAs). The AGDAs are set to be held on October 4, 6.30pm AEDT at the Forum Melbourne, as a part of Melbourne International Games Week celebrations. For those unable to attend in person, the event will be live streamed on the IGEA Twitch channel. The awards span 13 game categories and four Career and Culture awards, with the goal of highlighting the contributions of our local talent.

“The AGDAs are Australian video game excellence on display, a chance to celebrate successes as an industry and reflect on the year that has been,” said Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA. “Every year we come together to celebrate local talent and lift them onto the pedestal that they deserve. IGEA is proud of the Australian video games industry and its contribution to the local economy. The AGDAs are our chance to celebrate the creativity and technical capabilities of the teams and individuals making world class games right here in Australia and enjoyed all over the world. This is my favourite event of the year.”

While there are many categories to celebrate at the AGDAs, the coveted Australian Game of the Year award includes four nominees: Gubbins by Studio Folly, Moving Out 2 by SMG studio, Stray Gods: The Roleplaying Musical by Summerfall Studios, and Vactics by Lemur Conspiracy. All four finalists have received high praise from the AGDAs judging panel along with nominations in multiple other categories.

As we celebrate the pinnacle of excellence in the industry, IGEA also highlights upcoming local talent with the Excellence in Emerging Games award. This year there are three nominees, Final Profit: A Shop RPG by Brent Arnold, Partum Artifex by DalaKoala Games, and Rooftop Renegade by Melonhead Games. Each game is a prime example of the future of the Australian video game industry.

IGEA is delighted to welcome Gemma Driscoll from Good Game Spawn Point, and Harry Jun, the host of ABC Gamer’s Loot Drop, as the 2023 AGDAs presenters. Gemma, with five year’s experience working within the industry, has a deep passion for education and entertaining Australia’s young gamers. Comedian Harry Jun comes off of sold out runs at the Sydney Comedy festival in both 2022 and 2023 and has performed in venues all across Australia.

This year the panel of judges includes over 80 industry professionals, with varied specialisations in games development and journalism. IGEA believes in a transparent and fair judging system, click here to learn more about how we strive to achieve this.

IGEA presents the 2023 AGDAs finalists, please see the full list below.

 

2023 AGDAs Finalists

Excellence in ART

 

Excellence in GAMEPLAY

 

Excellence in NARRATIVE

 

Excellence in SOUND DESIGN

 

Excellence in MUSIC

 

Excellence in TECHNICAL DESIGN

 

Excellence in ACCESSIBILITY

 

Excellence in EMERGING GAMES

 

Excellence in IMPACTFUL GAMES

 

Excellence in MOBILE GAMES

 

Excellence in AR/VR Games

 

Excellence in ONGOING Games

 

GAME OF THE YEAR

 

Media spokespeople available:

  • Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA
  • Game Developers of finalist games and studios on request

 

MEDIA CONTACTS

Felicia McEntire
felicia@doublejump.com.au
0455 143 650

Paul Jones
paul@doublejump.com.au
0411 348 155

 

About IGEA

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net

 

New Zealanders play games to level up

01
Sep

A new report from IGEA shows that video games bring joy to Kiwis’ lives, nurture mental health, and create connections with family.

Wellington, 1 September 2023 – Game on, Kiwis! According to the New Zealand Plays report released today by IGEA in conjunction with Bond University, 79% of all New Zealanders play video games, a 6% increase from the previous report. New Zealand Plays (formerly known as Digital New Zealand) is the 7th report in the series spanning 14 years and explores the demographics and behaviours of New Zealand video game players and their attitudes towards games.

 

“New Zealanders have always loved video games, but this year we can see that this popular medium is growing faster than ever before across a wider demographic. Not only is the average video game player in New Zealand 35 years old, but Kiwi women over 45 years of age are more likely to play video games than men!” said Dr. Jeffrey Brand, Professor at Bond University and author of the report.

 

“The report reflects that gamers are everyone – highly educated professionals, students, your grandparents or auntie. Video games provide something for everyone.”

 

“This long running series of research delivered by Dr Brand and Bond University, again highlights the importance of games to the lives of every day New Zealanders.  79% of Kiwis play video games, and they play for fun and joy. Playing games will continue to grow as a popular past time across all age groups, whilever people are looking to create joy in their lives,” said Ron Curry, IGEA CEO.

 

New Zealand Plays found that the average Kiwi gamer is 35 years old, has played video games for at least 11 years, and spends 97 minutes per day (on average) playing games.

 

Highlights from the New Zealand Plays report:

  • 79% of all New Zealanders play video games (up from 73%)
  • 94% of New Zealander households have a device for playing video games (up from 92%)
    • 81% of game households have 2 or more devices for playing games
  • The average age of the New Zealand gamer is 35
  • 48% of New Zealanders who play video games are female
    • After the age of 45, women play more video games than men
  • The average New Zealander who plays video games has been playing for 11 years
  • New Zealanders over 65 years play to be challenged and improve mental health
  • New Zealander adults of all ages play to:
    • 91% – create feelings of enjoyment
    • 79% – bring joy to their lives
    • 60% – Nurture mental health
  • Naturally, fun is the main reason all New Zealanders play, regardless of age. For adults who play video games, having fun means:
    • 93% – achieving
    • 80% – exploring
    • 79% – competing
  • Of adults who play video games:
    • 71% – enjoy building in them
    • 68% – enjoy getting lost in a story
    • 62% – enjoy making mini-games and levels
    • 49% – enjoy attending in-game events
  • 93% of New Zealander parents who play video games do so to connect as a family
  • Adults think games can:
    • 93% – inspire students to be creative
    • 93% – help students manage stress
    • 89% – improve thinking skills for players of all ages
    • 88% – help students learn science and reading
  • New Zealander video game players’ top genre choices:
    • 37% – puzzle
    • 32% – action/adventure
    • 22% – board/card

 

If you would like to learn more about New Zealand Plays 2023, you can download the media kit, visit the IGEA website, or pick up the infographic (PDF or PNG), report, and key findings documents separately.

 

Australia Plays was also recently released and reflects similar results to New Zealand Plays.


Media spokespeople available:

  • Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA
  • Dr Jeffrey Brand, Professor at Bond University

 

MEDIA CONTACTS
Felicia McEntire
felicia@doublejump.com.au
0455 143 650

Paul Jones
paul@doublejump.com.au
0411 348 155

 

About IGEA

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net.

About New Zealand Plays

New Zealand Plays is a study of 809 New Zealander households represented by adult participants aged 18 and over. Household-level statistics include demographics, household device profiles, attitudes, and knowledge questions. Parents represent 287 of the 809 household adult respondents. Data on play time (including frequency and duration, location, time of day, genre preferences, and common playing experiences) were drawn from adult participants and one other nominated household member (n=1,328). Age, gender and player status were drawn from the participants and all members of the household (n=1,923). Participants were drawn randomly from the Qualtrics XM panel in April 2023; research was designed and conducted at Bond University. The margin of error is 2.7%.

Unlocking the Power of the DGTO Recording

18
Aug

Do you want to know how to leverage the Digital Games Tax Offset (DGTO) to supercharge your studio’s growth and creativity?

We’re excited to share the results of our webinar with the Office for the Arts and demystified the DGTO process, and offers invaluable guidance on how to prepare for and benefit from this exciting initiative. You’ll learn about the fundamentals to successfully lodging your first claim, including the importance of documentation and keeping your accounts in order.

This webinar is an enriching experience for all game developers, from seasoned veterans to aspiring newcomers. 

Watch the recording here:

Australia Plays 2023 Recording Released

17
Aug

For the past two weeks, all the team has been involved across the Australian states to bring you the statistics of Australia Plays.

Led by Dr. Jeffrey Brand, Professor at Bond University and author of the report, we kicked off in Sydney:

Headed down to Melbourne:

Back up to Canberra:

Made our way further up to Brisbane:

The week after, we went to Adelaide:

And finally, the final Australia Plays 2023 presentation in Perth.

 

We are so thankful to over 540 of you that came out to chat, and even more that engaged with our stats online, sharing and resharing. We spoke with game developers, publishers, investors and media who all wanted to know how Australians Plays.

Each event brought out new questions, ideas and engaging conversations about the industry we serve, and we thank all of you who helped make it a success.

If you weren’t able to make it, we have put together a recording of the Melbourne event for you to enjoy.  You can watch it here:

If you would like to learn more about Australia Plays 2023, you can visit the IGEA website, download the media kit, or pick up the Australia Plays 2023 InfographicReport, and Key Findings documents separately.

Australia Plays

11
Jul

Please join us for the launch of Australia Plays.

Australians play video games for many reasons – for entertainment, for fun, to connect, to educate and to create.

Australia Plays is the latest in the Digital Australia research series spanning 18 years which explores the demographics and behaviours of video game players in Australia and their attitudes towards games.

Dr Jeffrey Brand from Bond University, author of Australia Plays will present the latest findings and be available to answer questions.

Please join us at a location near you (Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Brisbane, Adelaide, & Perth)

Please RSVP via Eventbrite as capacity is limited in some venues

Please direct any inquiries to events@igea.net

We look forward to seeing you there.

Australian games industry celebrate passage of DGTO bill through legislation

21
Jun

21 Jun 2023 –  The highly anticipated Digital Games Tax Offset (DGTO) legislation (Treasury Laws Amendment (2022 Measures No. 4) Bill 2022) has passed through legislation today, to the delight of the Australian video game development industry.

 

The DGTO is a federal initiative that provides a 30% tax incentive to Australian video game developers with projects above $500,000.  Together with state government digital games rebates, Australia will now have one of the most generous games incentives globally, which supports highly creative and skilled digital businesses to deliver projects globally.  The DGTO has also been designed to attract investment and encourage multinational game studios to establish a base in Australia.

 

Recent funding announcements from the Federal Office for the Arts, including a $12 million increase in investment to support small to medium independent games studios (Revive National Cultural Policy) and Screen Australia’s First Nations Game Studio Fund, ensure that support is being provided to diverse creators and companies across the entire Australian game development ecosystem.

 

Australian games businesses have been preparing for the passage of the DGTO legislation since the policy’s announcement in May 2021, scaling their businesses accordingly.  The sector feels confident, buoyant and ready to embrace all the opportunities the DGTO will deliver.  IGEA’s last survey into the size of the Australian game development industry highlighted that revenue generated by developers had increased 26% over the previous year and the accompanying growth in full time employment was 59%.

 

Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA, commented, “Today is a momentous occasion for Australian games creators, who have an extraordinary reputation internationally.  These developers can now confidently proceed, expand and scale their businesses to deliver in-demand game content to a global audience and are well positioned to drive the knowledge economy.

 

“Recognition and support for our sector has been a long time coming and we cannot express how grateful we are to the Albanese Labor government for pushing the DGTO legislation through, to the Opposition for their bipartisan support for a policy proposal that had its genesis under the previous government, and to the Senate for passing it today.

 

“We are grateful for all the champions on both sides of the Parliament who have led the way for game development becoming an integral part of the broader Australian screen and creative industries, including the Senators who spoke in support of the DGTO yesterday.

 

“Making games has the ability to engage artists and technical specialists across the industry. We are excited for the career opportunities that growth in game development will bring to Australian creators.”

 

The DGTO will have retrospective effect from 1 July 2022, boosting not only new game projects going forward but those that have already been in development for the past year.

 

Update – 12.30pm – IGEA has just been advised that the Senate amended an unrelated part of the bill (unrelated to the DGTO), so the bill will need to go back to the lower house before it is passed by parliament.

Further Update – 6.00pm – IGEA has just been advised that the bill has passed through both Houses of Parliament

ENDS

Media spokespeople available:

Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA
Australian game developers who are eligible for the DGTO and have been preparing accordingly

Please contact  igea@doublejump.com.au

 

 

About IGEA

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net

Announcing the IGEA Educates Summit 2023: Access All Areas

07
Jun

IGEA is thrilled to announce that the IGEA Educates Summit is returning this year. Featuring talks, panels and studio visits, the theme this year is ‘Access All Areas’ and will be online and in person on 17 and 18 July 2023.  Attendees will learn about the latest game development practices and ensure that newcomers to the scene have the resources to help them make a successful debut.

The first day is The Summit, an online conference that features two tracks:

  • The Educator Track is focused on helping educators to build a stronger understanding of the modern game development industry.
  • The Student Track for early career/emerging developers features talks designed to bring them closer to the industry and tips on securing employment.

Featuring high quality presentations from AWS, Two Bulls/DEPT, Mighty Kingdom, Organa, mod.io, The Tech Council, ACS and The Stem Video Games Challenge to name a few, the schedule offers a backstage pass to the Australian games industry.  The full schedule can be found here, but we have prepared a handy guide for students and educators below.

The IGEA Educates Summit will continue to connect students directly to industry via 2 pathways:

  • AMA’s with industry experts – 30 minutes with an industry professional and get them to ask anything related to their discipline and the wider industry. Bookings will be available via The Summit’s online platform.
  • Student Showcase – Students will get a chance to present their work in an online showcase allowing the industry to check their demos and possibly “recruit them to their band”. This is an opportunity for final-year students and fresh graduates to put their best foot forward and present their work to game industry professionals all over Australia. Those students who submit have a chance to win a ticket to GCAP, Australia’s premier professional development and networking event for the games industry. Submissions will be accepted via The Summit’s online platform.

 

On day 2, we are inviting our educator guests to go ‘backstage’ and visit two prominent, leading Melbourne-based studios PlaySide Studios and Two Moos.  Game development educators will be able to immerse themselves in the latest industry practice, studio cultures, and networks. Peer behind the curtain of a modern development studio and stay up to date on what your students can expect when they enter the workforce.

To grab your tickets, which are FREE (except for the Studio Tours) please follow the link below and bring your friends too!

Get your Tickets now!

 

IGEA thanks PlaySide Studios and Two Moos for their generous support of the 2023 Educates Summit!

For more information please contact jens@igea.net

 

About IGEA

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net

IGEA and Awesome Black: So, you want to hire Blackfullas? Webinar.

02
Jun

Join the Interactive Games and Entertainment Association (IGEA) and Awesome Black for a discussion on sustainable hiring practices and how to apply them to seek out, recruit and retain Indigenous employees and partners.

Hosted by Travis De Vries and Ben Armstrong from Awesome Black, this 90-minute session is an introduction to the Dos and Don’ts of hiring First Nations staff.

Travis and Ben will take you through what you need to know about:

  • Engaging Indigenous candidates in ways that are appropriate and not self-serving
  • Avoiding tokenism and approaching the process with authenticity
  • Scaffolding networks and services that ensure long term safety and support for Indigenous staff
  • Understanding the importance of Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property (ICIP) to the games industry
  • Deciding whether your organisation is equipped and ready for Indigenous staff – and if it’s not, what you need to do to get there
  • Looking beyond a single-hire to create sustainable Career development practices for First Nations staff within the wider industry
  • Going beyond recruitment to focus on relationship building and community engagement

And much more!

Awesome Black is a creative social enterprise, developing original First Nations talent and unique storytelling content across a variety of mediums. In all things, Awesome Black practice and preach First Nations, first. Generating opportunities for First Nations people to build sustainable and successful careers in the arts and creative industries, Awesome Black is committed to building pathways out of poverty and towards equitable access to authentically represented, resourced and compensated participation in the creative industries for First Nations people.

Watch the recording here:

Help! I Want To Work In Video Games!

11
May

Are you looking to get into the video game industry and don’t know where to start? IGEA has collaborated with industry to build a handy guide of different jobs within the games industry.

There are so many different roles in the game industry, each with unique strengths and fields of study. This list aims to provide a comprehensive but not exhaustive list of major areas of study, roles you can have and what areas you should study.

A list of different game design jobs with a short description of each

Each role listed above has a corresponding sheet to print and share.

Access all the Game Job’s here.

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