Safer Internet Day – Time to check your tools

06
Feb

Contributed by Ron Curry, CEO IGEA

 

With most people playing games together online, Safer Internet Day provides a timely reminder for the industry to showcase the suite of tools available to parents, carers and players to ensure a positive experience for the millions of people who love to play games.

Our recent Australia Plays Survey showed that around 81% of Australians are gamers, with the average gamer playing for over 11 years. The dominant age group playing video games is adults between the ages of 18 and 64. Of all Australians who play video games, 48% are female, with an increasing number in the 55+ age group. As a result of these broad demographics, the tools we need are now for more than just parents looking to protect their children, although this is still significantly important. Active players are also looking to educate themselves about the tools they can use and actions they can take to ensure their hobby is a safe, respectful and enjoyable experience.

Research consistently shows that playing games connects people and people play games to be connected. The games industry is cognisant of designing and developing online products, services, devices and platforms, prioritising safe and secure user connections. The benefits of playing games for connection became abundantly clear during the pandemic, and many parents play games to connect with their children. 91% of parents who responded to the Australia Plays survey said they often play to connect as a family. Picking up the controller and playing video games with your kids can help you understand what your children enjoy and inform you of what is involved in the games they play. Games can help you start a conversation and are a chance to spend quality time together.

Safer Internet Day can be a day of reflection for gamers to consider how they can maximise their game play experience.  Do they need to adjust settings to make their experiences more enjoyable, or should they take stock of their behaviour and ask themselves if they contribute to a safe and fun place for others?

The video game industry empowers players with the tools to take control of their gameplay experiences.

In conjunction with our partners, IGEA has created a Trust and Safety hub.  The hub is a resource that provides holistic advice for parents and players to stay safe and continue enjoying online experiences whilst also honing in on the tools available on a specific device or platform.

Aside from IGEA’s Trust and Safety Hub, each platform and device offers specific tools and advice to help manage your gameplay experience. For example, Microsoft has released the Xbox Gaming Safety Toolkit, which provides carers with an overview of common safety risks and practical advice for responding to potential issues and enhancing children’s safety in a digital world.

Much like we’re reminded to check the smoke alarms in houses twice a year, Safer Internet Day serves as a reminder to review the tools available to you and your families to help you have a fun gaming experience. When our online and digital habits form such a big part of our lives, it is essential to remind ourselves of the ways to make our experiences safer and more enjoyable.

Australian Online Safety Act – Industry Codes

18
Dec

What is the eSafety Commissioner?

The eSafety Commissioner (eSafety) is an independent government agency that regulates online safety.

eSafety have powers under legislation that covers things like cyberbullying, image-based abuse and illegal online content. You can report things like cyberbullying or illegal content to eSafety: Report online harm | eSafety Commissioner

You can visit the eSafety Commissioner’s website at www.esafety.gov.au to learn more about its role and functions, and to access its online safety services and resources.

 

What are Industry Codes?

Under the Online Safety laws in Australia, the eSafety Commissioner can ask industry to create Industry Codes (i.e., rules) to ensure online safety is enacted in various industries.

Industry Codes are essentially a set of rules that are created by industry, and industry bodies (like IGEA). These Codes were created in a collaborative process, and for the Codes to be registered and therefore effective, they needed to be accepted by the eSafety Commissioner.

IGEA was involved in creating several codes that affect the video games industry, including the following which have been registered:

You can find more information, including copies of the Codes, here: https://onlinesafety.org.au/  and here: Register of industry codes and industry standards for online safety | eSafety Commissioner

 

What content to the Codes target?

These codes specifically ask parts of the industry to address Class 1 material which is made up of Class 1A and 1B material. These materials are part of the illegal and restricted online content that the eSafety commissioner regulates.

  • Class 1A material includes child sexual exploitation, pro-terror and extreme crime and violence material.
  • Class 1B material includes crime and violence, and drug-related material.

 

What does the Apps Distribution Services Code do?

This Code applies to ‘App Distributors’, like app stores. The Codes themselves include requirements for App Distributors including to make age/content ratings available, have certain safety staff available, and provide online safety information.

 

What does the Equipment Code do?

This Code applies to manufacturers and supplier of any equipment that connects to the internet, including gaming consoles. The Codes themselves are designed to assign certain obligations to certain devices, according to their risk. This includes things like ensuring there is a right to complain, ensuring there are tolls that reduce risk of harm to children, and including information about eSafety on packaging.

 

How do the Industry Codes keep players safe?

These codes help keep video game players safe by ensuring that the apps and equipment they use are free from harmful online content and that they have access to reporting and support mechanisms if they encounter such content.

They also help protect children from exposure to inappropriate online content and empower parents and guardians to manage their children’s online activities.

 

Are there any other codes?

Sort of! When the eSafety Commissioner does not register an Industry Code, they draft an alternative called an Industry Standard. eSafety is currently seeking feedback on two standards:

  • The draft Online Safety (Relevant Electronic Services – Class 1A and 1B Material) Industry Standard 2024; and
  • The draft Online Safety (Designated Internet Services – Class 1A and 1B Material) Industry Standard 2024.

 

In early 2024, we will hopefully have an idea of what these standards look like, and what they do.

IGEA Football Tournament 2023

06
Nov

Dust off your boots and shin-pads, it’s time for the annual IGEA Football tournament.  Join us on Monday 11 December 2023 at Cintra Park in Sydney.

Please RSVP  here to register your team or interest to play.

 

 

 

Global Report Reveals Positive Benefits of Video Gameplay

10
Oct

New report outlines the social, mental and emotional benefits of gameplay according to academic research and affirmed by survey of nearly 13,000 active players across 12 countries.

10 October 2023 – The Entertainment Software Association (ESA), in partnership with the Interactive Games and Entertainment Association (IGEA) and video game trade associations in Canada, Europe and South Korea, today released the first-ever Power of Play report. The report highlights the findings from peer-reviewed academic research about the positive effects of gameplay, which are confirmed by a survey of 12,847 active (weekly) players (ages 16 and older) in 12 countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Poland, South Korea, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States. The survey revealed that in addition to entertainment, video games provide players with a number of social and emotional benefits that are shared on a global level.

Having fun is the top reason people play video games (69% of global players), but they also play for a variety of other reasons including to keep their minds sharp (36%), and because playing games offers the ability to explore new worlds and ideas (27%). Nearly a quarter of respondents (24%) globally say they play video games to manage and/or improve their mental health. In all 12 countries, 71% of respondents said playing video games helps them feel less stressed. In Australia, 73% of respondents said the same, pointing out that video games also help them feel less anxious (67%) and less isolated/lonely by connecting them to others (57%).

“The Power of Play report affirms on a global scale what we already knew here in Australia; video games have a positive impact on everyday people, and people play video games daily,” said Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA. “IGEA is proud to be a part of this world-first report, combining the findings from a survey of almost 13,000 players across 12 countries alongside academic and peer-reviewed research papers. It comes as no surprise that the global video game community believes not only that video games are fun, but playing them helps us feel less anxious, less isolated, and less stressed.”

More than half (52%) of global players say video games helped them get through difficult times in their lives, with that number increasing to 62% for Australian respondents. Players agree that video games provide other mental health benefits:

  • About 75% of global players believe video games provide mental stimulation and stress relief.
  • Nearly two-thirds also find that video games provide them with a healthy outlet from everyday challenges (64%) and help them feel happier (63%).

 

Crossing geographic borders, video games also provide a platform for community building where otherwise not physically possible:

  • More than half of global respondents (51%) say they play games with other people online and 38% play with other people in person weekly, with 68% across all markets rating their experience of playing with others – both online and in person – as positive or extremely positive.
  • More than two-thirds (67%) of global players agree video games introduce people to new friends and new relationships. Nearly half (42%) of global players have met a good friend, spouse or significant other through video games.
  • More than three-quarters (77%) of global players agree video games bring different types of people together and nearly two-thirds (60%) say video games create a feeling of community.

 

People are not only skilled game players, but they also say they have gained valuable life skills applicable outside of the virtual world of video games:

  • Nearly three-quarters of global players (73%) agree video games can improve creativity.
  • Across the world, 69% of players agree video games build problem-solving, cognitive, teamwork, and collaboration skills.
  • Video games also promote adaptability and communications skills with 65% and 60% of global players agreeing, respectively.

 

You can find the full Power of Play report here.

 

Media spokespeople available:

  • Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA

 

MEDIA CONTACTS

Felicia McEntire, felicia@doublejump.com.au, 0455 143 650

Paul Jones, paul@doublejump.com.au, 0411 348 155

 

About IGEA

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net

About the ESA

The Entertainment Software Association (ESA) serves as the voice and advocate for the U.S. video game industry. Its members are the innovators, creators, publishers and business leaders that are reimagining entertainment and transforming how we interact, learn, connect and play. The ESA works to expand and protect the dynamic marketplace for video games through innovative and engaging initiatives that showcase the positive impact of video games on people, culture and the economy. For more information, visit the ESA’s website or follow the ESA on Twitter @theESA.

 

About the Power of Play Report Methodology

AudienceNet conducted an interactive online survey of 12,847 respondents in 12 countries. In each country, respondents were recruited via a screening survey sent out in accordance with quota samples that were statistically and demographically representative of the respective 16 year+ online populations. The screening questions ensured that, in each country, there was a final sample of 1,000+ active gamers, all of whom played video games for at least an hour per week. All survey respondents were accessed through professionally accredited consumer research panels.

AudienceNet is a fully-accredited global consumer research company, currently conducting nationally representative research in 52 countries. As a Market Research Society (MRS) Company Partner, AudienceNet is bound by the MRS Code Of Conduct, as well as GDPR in relation to the collection and handling of consumer research data.

The Power of Play

10
Oct

The Entertainment Software Association (ESA), in partnership with the Interactive Games and Entertainment Association (IGEA) and video game trade associations in Canada, Europe and South Korea, has released the first-ever Power of Play report. The report highlights the findings from peer-reviewed academic research about the positive effects of gameplay, which are confirmed by a survey of 12,847 active (weekly) players (ages 16 and older) in 12 countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Poland, South Korea, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States. The survey revealed that in addition to entertainment, video games provide players with a number of social and emotional benefits that are shared on a global level.

IGEA celebrates certainty for games funding in NSW

27
Sep

27 September 2023, IGEA and our NSW-based game development members welcome the continuation of games funding in NSW from the Minns Labor Government and greatly appreciate the consultation that has been held with the local games sector.

Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA, commented, “Through Minister Graham, the industry greatly appreciates the NSW Government’s willingness to listen to the impact that the sudden withdrawal of funding had on the local games development sector and the screen industry more broadly. We commend the Minister for his openness and decisiveness, providing certainty and commitment to the NSW digital games industry.

“Ongoing games funding in NSW will result in consistent full-time game development employees working permanently in the state. These support mechanisms enhance conditions and act as an accelerator for NSW based game development studios, and studios looking to establish a base in NSW, investing in the sector.”

IGEA recently provided a submission to the NSW Government in response to its creation of a new arts and cultural sector policy, outlining not only the importance and cultural significance of the video games industry but also how critical increased and ongoing government support is to keeping video game studios within NSW. The time for a renewed focus on game development is now and we will continue our productive consultation with the NSW Government on their current Arts, Culture and Creative Industries Policy discussion while maintaining our advocacy for NSW game developers.

Media spokespeople available:

  • Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA

MEDIA CONTACTS

igea@doublejump.com.au

About IGEA

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net

NSW Game Developers Left Behind

20
Sep

20 September 2023, IGEA and our NSW-based game development members are incredibly disappointed to see the reduction of games funding programs revealed in the NSW State budget. NSW has steadily built its presence in the games sector for the last couple of years. Our data shows NSW has achieved growth in full-time employees working in game development and studios establishing and maintaining a base in the region.

The landscape in Australia for the sector to surge in employment, skills, business attraction and exports is ripe. The Commonwealth Government fully supports the game development industry, demonstrated by introducing the Digital Games Tax Offset in conjunction with direct games funding through Screen Australia.  These Federal incentives support smaller and larger game projects created locally and encourage investment in Australia.

To capitalise on this and attract studios, other states across Australia are increasing and improving their game development funding to reap the benefits that a thriving, supported and recognised game development sector can tribute to a creative and technically skilled local economy. Sadly, NSW is now headed in the opposite direction. Not only is NSW the only state in Australia that does not have direct video game development funding options, a reduced rebate program leaves NSW with virtually no competitive edge and no incentives for up and coming video game creators to stay local.

IGEA has recently provided a submission to the NSW Government in response to its creation of a new arts and cultural sector policy, outlining not only the importance and cultural significance of the video games industry, but also how critical increased and ongoing government support is to keeping video game studios within NSW. We will continue our consultation with the NSW Government on their current Arts, Culture and Creative Industries Policy discussion while maintaining our advocacy for NSW game developers to create an environment where they can operate successfully and not at a competitive disadvantage to other States across Australia.

 

Media spokespeople available:

  • Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA

 

Media contacts

igea@doublejump.com.au

About IGEA

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net

Australia’s National Classification Scheme Gets a Boost

05
Sep

5 September 2023 Last night, the Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) Amendment (Industry Self-Classification and Other Measures) Bill 2023 passed the Australian Senate.

IGEA welcomes the passing of the Bill, which represents the first stage towards reforming and modernising the National Classification Scheme.

The Bill will empower accredited industry classifiers to make classification decisions and expand classification options for the video games industry. IGEA welcomes the ability of video game publishers and developers to utilise the flexibility and accessibility of self-classification given the size of the sector and the popularity of games as an entertainment medium.

The Australian video games industry has a long and productive history of working closely with the Government on classification. Authorised assessors already make classification recommendations to the Classification Board, while the industry-developed International Age Rating Coalition (IARC) classification tool for digital and mobile games was the first classification tool approved by the Australian Government. The introduction of accredited industry classifiers is a natural next step.

“IGEA believes that modernising the National Classification Scheme is not only long overdue but is critical to ensuring the needs and expectations of the community are being met”, said Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA. “We are grateful for Minister Rowland’s recognition that the Scheme needs updating to keep pace with Australians’ access to digital media and provide consumers and carers with accurate content information. We commend the Minister and the Government’s swift and tangible actions in progressing the two-stage reforms to ensure the Scheme is fit for modern digital media, including video games.”

We look forward to engaging with the government about the next steps to modernise the National Classification Scheme. Our industry is committed and dedicated to the safety of its players, and a fit-for-purpose National Classification Scheme will undoubtedly assist in fulfilling this commitment.

ENDS

Media spokespeople available: Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA
Contact info@igea.net

About IGEA
IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry. IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net

New Zealand Plays 2023

01
Sep

New Zealand Plays is the latest in the Digital New Zealand research series spanning 14 years.  Prepared in collaboration with Bond University, New Zealand Plays explores the demographics and behaviours of video game players in NZ and their attitudes towards games.

This piece of research again highlights that playing video games is very much a mainstream form of entertainment and the NZ population play for a variety of reasons including to have fun, to connect, to create and to educate.

The player base is diverse and dispersed across all demographics.  Further to that, the overwhelming majority of New Zealanders play games, and the majority of households own and use a variety of devices to play games.

 

To learn more:

Download the complete New Zealand Plays 2023 report here

Download the New Zealand Plays 2023 Key Findings Report here

Download the infographic for New Zealand Plays 2023 here

Victoria Powering More Video Games Industry Jobs

30
Aug

30 August 2023,  In addition to its many generous support mechanisms already in place for the Victorian video games industry, the Andrews Labor Government today announced a digital games and visual effects rebate to strengthen Victoria’s position as a global leader in games and screen production.

The rebate intends to attract more businesses and jobs to Victoria. Historically the leading state in Australia for supporting the games development sector, this is just one more, high-powered tool in Victoria’s arsenal, cementing its commitment to the creative industries.

IGEA is incredibly excited to see the Victorian Digital Screen Rebate complementing other support mechanisms available to the sector. The Victorian Digital Screen Rebate is designed to attract international projects and investment to Victoria, with successful projects eligible for a rebate of up to 10% of qualifying expenditure. In a first for Victoria, locally owned companies employing Victorians will be eligible to apply for a rebate of up to 15% of qualifying expenditure.

Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA, commented, “The missing ingredient in Victoria’s offering for game developer support has been a digital games and visual effects rebate. Through the work of the Minister for Creative Industries, Steve Dimopoulos, and the team at VicScreen led by Caroline Pitcher, Victoria has seriously upped the game on attracting new businesses to the state, creating an environment for existing and new businesses to thrive and succeed.

“We thank the Premier, the Minister, and their teams for their demonstrable faith in our industry and in Victoria’s commitment to being the leading state in video game development.”

 

Media spokespeople available:

  • Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA

MEDIA CONTACTS

igea@doublejump.com.au

 

 

About IGEA

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net

Australia Plays 2023

08
Aug

Australia Plays is the latest in the Digital Australia research series spanning 18 years.  Prepared in collaboration with Bond University, Australia Plays explores the demographics and behaviours of video game players in Australia and their attitudes towards games.

This piece of research again highlights that playing video games is very much a mainstream form of entertainment.  The overwhelming majority of Australians play video games and the player base is diverse and spans all age demographics. The primary reason people play games is to have fun.  Australians also play to connect, to educate and to create.

To learn more:

Download the complete Australia Plays 2023 report here

Download the Australia Plays 2023 Key Findings Report here

Download the infographic for Australia Plays 2023 here

Four out of five Aussies play video games, do you?

08
Aug

New data shows that Australian gamers are high achievers, use games to improve their mental health, and prefer puzzle games over action games.

 

Sydney, 8 August 2023 – Roll over footy! 81% of all Australians now play video games according to new data from the Australia Plays 2023 report, a research series spanning 18 years conducted by peak industry body Interactive Games & Entertainment Association (IGEA) in conjunction with Bond University. This is a 14% increase in two years from the renamed Digital Australia 2022 report. The report aims to explore the demographics and behaviours of video game players in Australia and their attitudes towards games. While only 56% of Australians tuned into the AFL Finals on Fox and Seven, according to the AFL 2022 annual report, over 80% are tuning into video games.

 

You can find a high resolution version of the infographic here.

“With 94% of Australian households having at least one device to play video games, there is no denying the significance of video games in the lives of everyday Aussies. 91% of parents are using video games to connect with their children, supporting cognitive growth and providing important family bonding time,” said Dr. Jeffrey Brand, Professor at Bond University and author of the report.

Dr. Brand continued, “Additionally, we saw more women playing games than ever before with 48% of Australian gamers being female, up 2% on the previous report, with women over 65 more likely to play video games than elderly men. Aussie gamers over 65 play to be challenged and improve their mental health, with a focus on mental stimulation and fighting dementia. Video games offer something for everyone – anyone can be a gamer, not just children and students, but parents, grandparents, your coworkers, and your boss.”

“Australia Plays 2023 proves that Australia is a nation that loves to play, achieve, connect, and learn through video games,” said Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA. “Over 80% of the population is now engaging with video games, making it clear that video games have become a part of everyday life. Over 90% of Australian gamers say they find joy in video games, as is reflected by our successful local industry. Video games have proven to be very important to this country’s economy, as can be seen by the recently released consumer video games sales data in Australia.”

The Australia Plays report continues to bust stereotypes, with the average gamer at 35 years of age, of any gender, who has been playing video games for 11 years, and plays for roughly 90 minutes at a time. Aussie gamers are playing to create feelings of enjoyment, nurture mental health, to socialise with others, attend in-game events, and more.

Highlights from the Australia Plays report include:

  • 81% of all Australians play video games (up from 67%)
  • 94% of Australian households have a device for playing video games (up from 92%)
    • 76% of game households have 2 or more devices for playing games
  • 48% female – more women and girls are playing than ever before (up from 46%)
    • After age 55, Australian women play more video games than Australian men
  • 35 years – the average age of video game players in Australia
  • 75% of Australians play video games with others
  • 91% of parents play with their children to connect as a family
  • Australians play video games to:
    • 91% – Create feelings of enjoyment
    • 82% – Bring joy to their lives
    • 66% – Nurture mental health
  • In games, Australians enjoy:
    • 92% – Achieving
    • 81% – Exploring
    • 59% – Socialising with others
  • Of adults who play video games:
    • 71% enjoy building in-game
    • 65% enjoy making mini-games and levels
    • 54% enjoy attending in-game events
  • Australian video game players’ top genre choices:
    • 36% – Puzzle
    • 32% – Action/Adventure
    • 21% – Strategy
  • Australians over 65 years play to be challenged and improve mental health
  • Top benefits of video games for ageing well according to Australian adults:
    • Increasing mental stimulation
    • Promoting mindfulness
    • Fighting dementia

 

If you would like to learn more about Australia Plays 2023, you can visit the IGEA website, download the media kit, or pick up the Australia Plays 2023 Infographic, Report, and Key Findings documents separately.

 

Media spokespeople available:

  • Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA
  • Jeffrey Brand, Professor at Bond University

 

MEDIA CONTACTS

Felicia McEntire, felicia@doublejump.com.au, 0455 143 650

Paul Jones, paul@doublejump.com.au, 0411 348 155

 

About IGEA

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net

About Australia Plays

Australia Plays is a study of 1,219 Australian households represented by adult participants aged 18 and over. Household-level statistics include demographics, household device profiles, attitudes, and knowledge questions. Parents represent 414 of the 1,219 household adult respondents. Data on play time (including frequency and duration, location, time of day, genre preferences, and common playing experiences) were drawn from adult participants and one other nominated household member (n=1,937). Age, gender and player status were drawn from the participants and all members of the household (n=3,234). Participants were drawn randomly from the Qualtrics XM panel in April 2023; research was designed and conducted at Bond University. The margin of error is 2.7%.

Help IGEA highlight who plays games and why

14
Jul

IGEA is launching our major consumer research reports shortly which reveal detailed information about who exactly plays video games in Australia and New Zealand.  The research reports will be called Australia Plays and New Zealand Plays.

These reports are the latest iteration in the Digital Australia and Digital New Zealand series spanning 18 years. They cover the demographics and behaviours of video game players in Australia and New Zealand and their attitudes towards games.

We also have another ‘secret’ project we are working on with details to be launched in October.

The data has been collected and the reports are being written now. In preparation for our launch events, we are inviting players to share their stories via short recordings about what playing video games mean to them.

The details are as follows:

 

WHAT – We are asking players to answer questions in video format that we can use at our launch events and for general PR for each report.

WHY – These video case studies allow us to bring the research to life and share stories about players across Australia and New Zealand.

WHEN – We need your videos asap.  The deadline is Tuesday 25 July.  Submission details are below.

HOW – Record yourself answering the following questions.  You can answer 1, you can answer 2 – or better still, you can answer all of them.  Just remember we need separate videos for each question.

 

The questions are:

  1. People play games for many reasons such as entertainment, to connect with people and/or to relax. Why do you play?
  2. Video games allow us to build, create, socialise, experience stories, collaborate and so much more. What kind of activities do you like doing within games?
  3. What does playing video games mean to you?
  4. Complete this sentence – Playing video games helps me…
  5. Playing games can help people manage their mental health. Does playing games help you with your mental health? How?
  6. Can you recall a specific time that video games helped you with your mental health?

 

Filming Guideline recommendations

  • Film in landscape aspect ratio
  • Film in a quiet, well-lit location
  • Introduce yourself with your name, age, and state or territory
  • Allow 5-10 seconds before your intro for editing purposes
  • Aim for answers to be under 30 seconds each
  • Please do not use filters
  • Each question requires a separate video to be submitted
  • Begin each answer with the question. For example:

Question: Why do you play games?

Answer: I play games because…

 

To submit your video, please complete the details on this form.

We will advise you if your video has been selected for the events or if we need further details.

Thanks so much for your help and any questions can be emailed to info@igea.net

IGEA welcomes steps to modernise Australia’s Classification Scheme

22
Jun

The Hon Minster Michelle Rowland MP, the Australian Minister for Communications, today announced a major development for classification reform in Australia, outlining the steps to modernise the National Classification Scheme.  The Minister today also introduced a bill into the House of Representatives that will, among other reforms, enable the Classification Board to accredit industry classifiers to make classification decisions, including for video games. IGEA is closely reviewing the bill.

IGEA, on behalf of the Australian video games industry, welcomes Minister Rowland’s commitment to modernise the classification system and appreciates the move towards empowering industry accredited classifiers, subject to appropriate safeguards. We are also pleased that the Minister has flagged that there will be a second stage of reform to commence later in the year to help establish fit for purpose regulatory arrangements to ensure classification criteria matches evolving community standards and expectations.

IGEA Educates Webinar – Preparing for the DGTO and End of Financial Year Considerations

13
Jun

Please join IGEA and a panel of our expert members as they present the Digital Games Tax Offset (DGTO) and associated opportunities, along with end of financial year requirements and budgeting considerations for local games businesses. There will be plenty of time for Q and A.

Our panellists are:

Tim Philips, CEO, Fulcrum Media Finance

Ben Chiverton, Partner, Nagle Accounting

Annabel Livingston, Partnerships Key Account Director, Ebury

Date: Wednesday 21 June at 1.00pm via Zoom

Cost: Free

How: Register at our Eventbrite

Australians subscribe to video game growth

08
Jun
Sales data shows Australia’s games industry is valued at $4.21 billion

8 June, 2023 – Australians went all-in last year on video games with $4.21 billion spent across hardware, software, and peripherals, according to consumer sales data released today by IGEA. Digital purchases improved by 6%, reaching $1.5 billion, with video game subscriptions showing a substantial 55% increase.

 

“The Australian video game market thrived in 2022, driven by a diverse range of new software releases and improved hardware availability compared to the year prior. The retail software market experienced a healthy growth of +10% in value spend, but the significant takeaway was the increase in overall spending in 2022 compared to 2021, attributed to a substantial portion of software sales being driven by new releases rather than the more typical back-catalogue titles.” said Aidan Sakiris, Asia Pacific Regional Manager at Sparkers.

“Hardware availability improved, with PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series seeing +17% and +15% unit growth respectively, while Nintendo Switch remained the best-selling Australian hardware platform in unit sales,” continued Sakiris.

Aussies spent $1.15 billion dollars through traditional retail outlets – including a 7% jump in spending on physical hardware and software purchases. Given the stabilisation of retail supply chains, Australians had more access to the newest consoles than in previous years. Combined with the new games on offer, this led to a boom in console sales through retail stores.

Australia’s mobile gaming habits remained stable, with $1.56 billion spent on games played via smartphone, an increase of 3% from the previous year.

Tom Wijman, Lead Analyst Games Newzoo highlighted “Australian players’ spending habits outperformed the global average, which in fact saw a yearly spending decline. Australian players’ appetite for multi-game subscriptions is also clear: growth in this category outpaced the global average by nearly +5%.”

“It’s great to see consistent performance of sales across games channels.  Australia’s traditional games retailers continue to perform well, increasing revenue by 7% against 2021. Bricks-and-mortar retailers continue to play an important role in game distribution and are a strong indicator of the industry’s stability. Australians love to play video games; they use them for entertainment, to have fun, to relax and connect with friends and family,” said Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA. “With such a strong retail and distribution base and a population that loves playing games, it is no surprise that sales have exceeded $4 billion.  The added benefit is that the consumer demand for games in Australia and internationally allows Australia to build a substantial video game development industry.”

IGEA will provide its latest consumer research on Australians playing video games, why they play them, and how they play. You can find previous reports here.

To download the accompanying infographic, click PDF or Jpeg

ENDS

Media spokespeople available:

  • Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA
  • Aidan Sakiris, Asia Pacific Regional Manager of Sparkers
  • Tom Wijman, Lead Analyst Games, Newzoo

Please contact igea@doublejump.com.au for more information.

About IGEA

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net

Notes about the Newzoo research

The impact of changes in the AUD-to-USD exchange rate is also worth pointing out. Newzoo estimates the games market size in US$ value, which means we convert local spending into US$. Newzoo does this by taking the US$ exchange rate at the end of each quarter. The value of the US$ compared to other currencies rose rapidly during 2022, which has two consequences: the US$ value of companies that earn the lion’s share of their revenues in non-U.S. markets is lower than it would have been using the constant currency approach as is the revenue recognized by U.S.-based companies for revenues earned in regions outside the U.S.

AUD amounts quoted in this press release and infographic were derived from the average of the AUD-to-USD exchange rate for 2022.

New Zealand Video Game Consumer Sales Show Strength In Numbers

08
Jun

Kiwis come to play both physically and digitally

8 June, 2023 – New Zealanders love to play games as shown by new consumer sales data released today by the Interactive Games and Entertainment Association (IGEA). Trends are up in almost all categories as over $608 million was spent on video games in 2022, up 12% from 2021. While the digital space saw significant growth, traditional bricks and mortar retail has not lost ground in the New Zealand market.

Traditional retail proved its value, as sales are up 20% on the previous year with traditional retail remaining the backbone of the industry in an ever growing age of online and digital games.

 

“The experience of heading to a physical outlet to purchase games, games hardware or peripherals remains an important and invaluable part of the purchasing process to many consumers,” said Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA. “New Zealanders love playing games, they help connect us with friends and family, but most importantly games are a source of joy and entertainment.”

“In 2022, the New Zealand video game market witnessed remarkable revenue growth across all GSD tracked categories, reflecting an increased spend on higher-priced items. Retail software experienced a staggering growth of +33% for 2022 in value spending when compared to 2021, predominantly fuelled by the sales of new retail software releases at full price. Hardware also experienced impressive performance from PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series hardware in comparison to the previous year with increased stock availability, but also continual success from Nintendo Switch year-on-year in New Zealand,” said Aidan Sakiris, the Asia Pacific Regional Manager at GSD Integration.

“Despite the challenges posed by retail store closures in 2021 due to COVID, numbers for 2022 in New Zealand show a notable increase in spending on full-game new software at retail stores, coupled with a significant growth in spend on hardware with increased availability. God of War Ragnarok emerged as the best-selling title in New Zealand, followed by Pokemon Legends: Arceus and FIFA 23, all of which were new releases. The top 10 retail titles in 2022 were exclusively comprised of new releases, a rare occurrence, highlighting their popularity and impact to 2022 new software spending habits across New Zealand,” Aidan continued.

“In terms of hardware sales, value generated from the New Zealand hardware market saw a +15% growth compared to 2021. PlayStation 5 (+17%) and Xbox Series (+15%) saw increased unit sales compared to 2021, resulting in higher overall value generated from these platforms in 2022,” said Aidan.

Digital trends swayed, yet increased as Kiwis spent over $73 million on full game digital titles, a slight decrease from 2021. The data shows that many New Zealanders moved instead to digital game subscriptions, with sales doubling from $19 million to over $38 million in 2022. Despite this shift, total digital sales still rose by over $13 million. The shift could point toward the ever expanding services the video game industry provides, with more subscription services appearing on console, PC and mobile.

Additionally, mobile gaming saw phenomenal growth with a massive increase of 14%, Kiwi’s spent $28 million more on their handheld devices compared to 2021.

Tom Wijman, Lead Analyst Games Newzoo expressed “New Zealand’s players buckled the global trend on mobile spending and in the full game digital category. Newzoo estimates that global spending on mobile went down year on year, but that was not so in New Zealand. Similarly, despite the lighter release schedule negatively impacting global spending in the digital category, the category still grew slightly in New Zealand.”

Later this year IGEA will launch its latest consumer research as to who plays games in NZ, why they play and how they play.  Previous reports can be found here.

To download the infographic, please follow these links.  PDF, jpeg

ENDS

Media spokespeople available:

  • Ron Curry, CEO of IGEA
  • Aidan Sakiris, Asia Pacific Regional Manager of Sparkers
  • Tom Wijman, Lead Analyst Games, Newzoo

Please contact igea@doublejump.com.au

About IGEA

IGEA (Interactive Games & Entertainment Association) is the peak industry association representing the voice of Australian and New Zealand companies in the computer and video games industry.  IGEA supports the games industry’s business and public policy interests through advocacy, research and education programs. For more information, please visit www.igea.net

Notes about the Newzoo research

The impact of changes in the NZD-to-USD exchange rate is also worth pointing out. Newzoo estimates the games market size in US$ value, which means we convert local spending into US$. Newzoo does this by taking the US$ exchange rate at the end of each quarter. The value of the US$ compared to other currencies rose rapidly during 2022, which has two consequences: the US$ value of companies that earn the lion’s share of their revenues in non-U.S. markets is lower than it would have been using the constant currency approach as is the revenue recognized by U.S.-based companies for revenues earned in regions outside the U.S.

NZD amounts quoted in this press release and infographic were derived from the average of the NZD-to-USD exchange rate for 2022.

IGEA submission to the proposed mandatory minimum classifications for gambling-like content in computer games

07
Jun

IGEA has lodged a submission to the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development, Communications and the Arts in response to its Consultation Draft – Guidelines for the Classification of Computer Games 2023.

More information on the proposed Guidelines can be found here.

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