IGEA Celebrates International Women and Gender Diverse Day 2024

08
Mar

The theme for International Women’s Day 2024 is “Invest in women: Accelerate progress”.

Each year IGEA likes to celebrate and expand upon International Women’s Day, branching out to include gender diverse people to recognise that marginalisation that occurs across many genders.  This year to mark the occasion, we are celebrating women and gender diverse people in our membership, working across all areas of the local video games industry by profiling them on our website.

We think it’s important to showcase the people behind the products and also the types of roles available in the industry with a view to inspire the next generation of women and gender diverse people considering a career in games.

We intend for this to be a living resource that we will update regularly and potentially expand.

In the spirit of inclusion this is open to women both cis and trans, as well as gender diverse people.

Additionally, we have seen some amazing statistics coming out of Australia regarding gender diversity, both in who makes games and who plays them.

To download a PDF of this infographic to use or print, click here.

If you have any questions or would like to get involved, please reach out to Sav (sav@igea.net) or Raelene (raelene@igea.net). Otherwise, please read on for our showcase!


Liz Ballantyne

Tell us about your job:

Everyday I work with our crazy-talented team, encouraging new ideas and processes to make games that not only look good but feel good too. How we make games is just as important to me as the games we make – ensuring our team feels supported, with space to create and confidence to share ideas, big, small, and out of this world!

I also mentor on various programs, from students to leads, and serve as an industry representative on the QUT Industry Advisory Board for Games and IT and the Screen Queensland Equity and Diversity Taskforce. Fostering and supporting diverse talent to not only survive but thrive!

Why Games?

I remember spending hours as a kid creating art and music in Mario Paint on the SNES! The little mouse trackpad, combined with the playful Mario-themed sprites, had me hooked! Years later, I started working as a Graphic Designer, and after graduating, I found my way to the wonderful world of games. But I often think of Mario Paint as a gentle nudge in the right direction!

The playfulness of games in their creation is what has stayed with me and what I enjoy the most. Having friends to make and play games with is pretty great too!

What is your favourite game?

Little Big Planet


Molly Campbell

Tell us about your job:

Well, I write a lot of emails! At IGEA, I am responsible for the organisational operations of the company as well as assisting with webinars, GCAP, AGDAs and all other events that IGEA hosts. My average day consists of meetings and task tackling and no two days are the same. I’m lucky to be in my position at IGEA because every enquiry we get is unique and exciting. I learn more and more about Industry everyday and enjoy meeting our members across Australia and New Zealand.

Why Games?

Video Games were a big part of my childhood. I have so many fond memories repeatedly playing CTR with my family and giggling every time my parents hit a wall. Games bring so much joy to households and this industry is so diverse and vast, that I have loved meeting those who make and play games. Turns out, it’s everyone!

What is your favourite game?

Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back


Riley Hanlin

Tell us about your job:

I have the awesome job of creating 3D environments for our studio. Whether it’s a crafting bench, a collection of plants or even a cosy building for one of our characters, I’m on it. My day is always a little bit different depending on what I’m working on, but the process usually starts with collecting reference images and then formulating a prototype model in Maya for the team to look at. Once a model has been approved, I polish it all up, texture it in Substance and Photoshop, then set it up in Unity, ready for the programmers!

But that’s just the pipeline for model creation. I also spend a lot of time reading through our character bios and thinking of ways I can tell stories through the pieces that I’m making, giving them as much personality as I can. I’m never working on one thing for too long though – you wear many hats in an indie studio! There’s plenty of jobs to do in Unity like creating collision, navigation meshes and foliage wind effects. I even got to make outfits for our main character, as well as a duck! I have too many programs and internet tabs open every day!

Why Games?

I always knew I wanted to make games! Games have played a huge role in my life. As kids my brother and I would sit in front of the telly with our consoles for hours, coming up with our own games-within-games or even just playing the same demos on discs over and over again. We often had game nights where the whole family would bicker over Mario Kart, laugh at You Don’t Know Jack and make endless notes for puzzles in The Neverhood. Games really bring everyone together!

I also drew a lot as a kid. I was constantly creating characters and creatures, making up the worlds they lived in, what magical powers they had. I did think I’d go into character design but when I got my hands on 3D at 17 there was no turning back. I fell in love with environments. The fact that I could create my own worlds felt so exhilarating—there’s limitless potential for creativity in games. There’s always been something so special and magical about exploring a new world for the first time and I love that I can create that experience for others.

What is your favourite game?

The Neverhood


Kylee Kay

Tell us about your job:

The life of a CEO of a VR game Development company is certainly never boring. Though it probably sounds much more fun that it really is. It all depends on who you ask of course. Business for me is fun and I suppose my job is to run the business of the studio, not make the games. I spend a lot of my time dealing with staff and processes, finances and legalities. There are never any guarantees of success when making games so it is a high risk industry filled with extremely talented people.

My job is to bring the talent together to create something the market hasn’t seen ideally that makes it commercially viable and for us at Toast, presents also with a social conscience. Games that are entertaining and impactful with underlying or subliminal messaging that speak to broad ranges of people. No one day is the same. Lots of meetings, lots of discussion and collaboration. Lots of navigating new technology still really in its infancy and certainly not having yet reached critical mass .

To summarise, I’m responsible for managing Toast’s business operations and upholding our values of inclusivity and diversity. Ultimately, I am responsible for the resourcing, production and successful release of our titles in production and positioning the business for ongoing success and value post-release of each.

This includes responsibility for marketing, production, finance, legals etc. – The buck stops here!

Why Games?

Life is about fun and experiences. I have travelled the world and still love to but when Covid hit the world stood still. Except for gaming! It’s a long story of how I came to be where I am, but I am now convinced that gaming came to me – for my son. He has ADHD but absolutely loves to play games and loves VR (in small doses of course). He has a design focused mind and all that I have learnt and continue to learn around gaming I store for when he is old enough to want to know more. He is only 7 so a bit young to make games… yet. I had an Atari when i was a kid. Yes, frogger was a hit. It has been such a joy to watch game development evolve and to be part of that now is simply extraordinary.

What is your favourite game?

Pacman of course. I’m old school and it brings back so many innocent childhood memories.


Jane Kennington

Tell us about your job:

As Game Director, I’m overseeing and constantly re-evaluating the production and timelines of our game, Incolatus, to make sure it hits marketing beats and can be released on time. In the dev sense, I’m playing the game every day with every change that is made and evaluating the ‘fun’ factor, suggesting and debating changes and improvements to the core loop with the team. On the business side, I’m applying for grants, talking with publishers, and having weekly meetings with our marketing manager to make sure we’re getting our name out there.

As 3D Generalist, which is my other main job, I’m creating and rigging 3D models, UV mapping, creating textures and materials for them, designing levels and environments and bringing the whole visual aesthetic together.

I like to say that I do everything except for programming and music. As a new studio working on our first project; if there’s something that needs to get done, I’ll find a way. This includes odd jobs like graphic design, website design, UI design, writing dialogue, video editing, sound effect creation, presskit creation, voice acting, font creation, occasional bug fixes etc etc. While I would like to have a dedicated person for all these jobs, of course, we all know the idea ‘we wear many hats in Indie.’ That’s how it is at the moment.

Outside of Funny Fintan Softworks I’m the Vice Chair of the WA Games Industry Council (name change pending from Let’s Make Games) which means I oversee and am involved with many matters affecting the local industry, at the moment I’m collaborating with a local anime/art themed convention to get our local games on display, it’s all about supporting the games projects coming out of WA.

Why Games?

I actually kind of fell into it. My original interest was in film and CGI, which led me to learning effects and 3D programs. In year 10, I was in a project management class and assigned the task ‘create a project that you can manage over time.’ My friend asked if we could create a videogame, I said ‘I don’t know.’ So we googled it. Turns out my skills in CG and film helped get us a start.

I didn’t initially care too much for the project, until I played Doom 2016 for the first time and then Eternal the week it came out. I was like ‘This is the best thing I’ve ever played, why isn’t the art style and world of Destiny made into a gameplay loop like this.’ Thus the original idea for our mix of gameplay and art styles. Now there was a game I WANTED to make.

The idea from the teacher was that we’d be managing the project over the course of that year, but we ended up making a 3-year plan for a videogame that we could take to publishers/screen agencies to get a job. That wasn’t the original intention, but it’s one that grew after months and years of iteration, realising we had a real shot of turning this into a career.

Turns out it worked! In our fifth year of production, I’m the only one left from that original student team, but people drift apart in life and have different priorities.

What is your favourite game?

Doom Eternal


Raelene Knowles

Tell us about your job:

I’ve been working in games for longer than I care to remember. I love working at IGEA and it’s an honor to be a part of this vibrant and creative industry and be constantly inspired by all of our community and stakeholders My role is to ensure we provide value for members and the broader industry through the provision of services and projects across our 4 main pillars – Advocate, Educate, Create and Celebrate.

I look after our events, our research projects, our communications and am across all of our member services. My days are varied and interesting and whilst some of the projects seem the same when we deliver them annually, they are always different due to the nature of working in a dynamic industry.

Why Games?

I love the opportunity to engage with so many different stakeholders both internally and externally to IGEA to highlight the power of games. When I started almost 15 years ago, we had a couple of issues under management – now we probably have 12+, alongside many other deliverables. The work is interesting, sometimes very challenging and I’ve loved to see our industry grow, our membership grow and of course our team grow as well. The people we represent are great people and the work they produce is inspiring.

What is your favourite game?

Don’t judge – Rollercoaster Tycoon.


Skye Lavelle

Tell us about your job:

I’m typically bouncing between art and marketing tasks throughout the day – one minute I’m making menu concepts and the next I’ll be writing a newsletter. I’m responsible for creating design briefs or concepting new ideas for our small team, but also updating our socials and making new marketing materials.

I just love the process of creating, regardless of whether it resides inside or outside the game! As someone still new to the industry, I really enjoy pushing myself to learn two disciplines and how they complement each other!

Why Games?

I’ve always been drawn to games. To me, videogames are the ultimate storytelling device, an infinite source to explores narratives through so many different visual and interactive experiences. And as an artist it’s just a perfectly endless way to develop new styles and skillsets.

Plus with my ever-increasing love for immersive sims, the more I play, the more I appreciate game development and become inspired to see how much I can grow!

What is your favourite game?

Prey (2017)


Michela Ledwidge

Tell us about your job:

Running Mod means juggling art, science and business and there’s no average day. Too many hats. On a good day I’ve got a finely balanced diet of research, time on the tools experimenting, adding features or tweaking while trying not to break things, playtesting builds, running our all-important standup meeting, and trying to stay connected to the wider world who enable and help us do what we do.

Why Games?

I’ve been making games and tools since the Commodore 64 but it’s only been relatively recently that the kind of cinematic interactive entertainment I dreamed of has become a creative and commercial reality. “Game” is a such a convenient short hand for interactive and immersive entertainment more broadly. There are easier ways to make a living but there’s so much satisfaction in the process of crafting something new. There aren’t many areas of life where all my interests converge like this and I feel very lucky to run a true indie. My favourite part of the gig is getting stuff made and into the hands of people who enjoy it.

What is your favourite game?

The Last Of Us


Caitlin Lomax

Tell us about your job:

Running my own studio I get to put so many different hats on! Most of the time I’ve got my Producer hat on and I’m wrangling Jira tickets, chasing deliverables, milestone reports, pitch decks and checking builds. The cool thing about the way we do things is that I get to be across a few projects at once. I love the challenge of understanding the different ways each team is working and planning out the dependencies between all the tasks and resources.

Alot of our projects are using emerging technology and I get to use my programming background to create R&D plans & build prototypes of things that not many people are doing yet, it’s really exciting!

Why Games?

Christmas 2000 – My sister and I got beanbags and a Playstation 1. I think we played a mix of Crash Bandicoot and Mary Kate & Ashley’s Magical Mystery Mall non-stop until we had to go back to school. I knew I loved games but I grew up in a regional town in WA where there was nowhere to learn to make games. It wasn’t until I was 13 and my addiction to The Sims was out of control that my Dad got me a book, “Game Programming for Teens”. I had to earn time on The Sims by spending time learning to code. I just got addicted to learning to code instead! I never pursued programming professionally, but the knowledge came in really handy to get my first job in games as a Producer. I love how there’s so much to consider when making a game across so many different skillsets and the collaboration that it takes.

What is your favourite game?

Bust-a-groove


Kiera Lord

Tell us about your job:

I’m pretty socially focused for a programmer. Usually I’d start a morning by wrapping up whatever I had left over from the day before and then check in with whoever’s using whatever I’ve been working on recently to see if there’s anything that needs changing or fixing.

My favorite thing is getting problems where I can deep dive and learn new things. These happen occasionally but it’s great fun digging deep into systems or engines and finding out why something works the way it does.

Why Games?

Honestly there really wasn’t a choice. I was one of those kids who at age 9 discovered programming, decided I wanted to make games and everything else was a straight line from there. It was a hobby from childhood and then a job from 2005 onwards.

I’ve done a few games adjacent jobs of the years but it’s never been the same. I know it’s not for everyone, but for me… I’ve never found anything else as satisfying or rewarding as working on games.

What is your favourite game?

Neverwinter Nights


Emma McCaw

Tell us about your job:

As a QA Analyst, I test game functionality as well as reproduce and document defects found within software to ensure they meet the user’s needs and the client’s requirements. I design and maintain documentation to ensure adequate test coverage and consistency for the developing product.

Why Games?

I love the intricacies of game testing and development. Games are a way for people to escape reality, engage in fun activities alone or with friends, and use the space to look after their mental health. Games allow players to forge their own experiences at their own pace and learn new life skills or improve overall knowledge. This is what makes games fascinating, and I love being a part of this unique medium. One of the things I love about my job as a QA Analyst is having the opportunity to detect and report experience-altering defects before they reach the end user.

What is your favourite game?

That is a tough question to answer as I have too many favourite games. But a game that I will always return to is The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim. I love Skyrim for its vast, explorable map, hidden secrets, fun gameplay mechanics, dragons, intriguing narrative, and never-ending replayability.


Zoe McNeany

Tell us about your job:

Being an Environment Artist is about visually bringing the world of the game to life!

In my role I undertake a lot of different tasks encompassing Technical and Creative skillsets. This can include Modelling Terrain and Prop Assets, Creating Textures and Sculpting High Poly Models to optimizing models and troubleshooting technical issues with assets in the game. I love the blend of creative and technical thinking needed for this role.

In my role as an Environment Artist I also utilize the assets that the whole art team has crafted and arrange them in the Environment.
This Usually starts from updating the LD Grey-box Block out to a fully realized environment scene, all the way to polishing the fine details of the Environment, including adding lighting in order to help guide the player and set the mood of the environment.

Environment Art is all about Enriching the players experience of the world and helping to support the gameplay through design and visual storytelling!

Why Games?

I have always loved playing games and am lucky to share the hobby with a lot of my family. As a kid I loved playing Zelda with my Mum and Sister, Crash Team Racing with my Dad and Gauntlet legends with my Grandma. I have always loved being creative and used to fill my notebooks at school with drawings and stories.

When Spirited Away was released I was decided I wanted to become an animator, I was inspired by the Story, Art and World crafted for the movie and decided to pursue studying animation after I left school. Whilst attending Uni for Animation I was introduced properly to 3D software and found that I loved creating in 3D!

I love the power that Games have to transport you into a story and world and let you shape the experience you have within that world. As an Environment Artist I love composing worlds for people to enjoy and embedding little stories into each environment and Prop I create.

What is your favourite game?

Mass Effect 2 / Zelda: Ocarina Of Time


Lucy Mutimer

Tell us about your job:

I’m one of those tremendously lucky individuals who gets to work on two different sides of game development.

Half of my work week I work as a freelance artist for the video games industry. This means that teams and studios pull me in to do everything from in-game assets, animations, and User-Interface design to concept art and art direction. Sometimes I’m the only arty person on the team and other times I work with art teams full of talented people. Every project is different and I feel incredibly privileged to have had my hands in as many baskets as I’ve had. Some people I’ve worked with include Normal Wholesome Games and Lumi.

When I’m not slinging art for clients or yelling at art programs, you can find me using my gift of the gab to work as a talent agent for Supaglu. Supaglu is an agency that specialises in the VFX, Animation and Video games Industry helping tremendously talented people find incredible studios to call work-home. My role has me chatting to game developers and studios and helping them find employment and freelancers for projects. While this role is new to me, I have found it rewarding chatting to everyone about why they love what they do and what their ideal person or role looks like.

Why Games?

I never set out to have games be my career. Really early on, I had the impression that working in the games industry was something reserved for cool, but mostly silent older brothers of friends who wore Nine Inch Nails shirts and moved to America to work. I was pleasantly surprised to find that this wasn’t the case, and after a stint in graphic design, I found my footing here. I stay in the games industry because I don’t think there’s anything else quite like it. We smoosh creativity and code together to make interactive stories for people, and I think that’s something very special. It’s one of the most creatively fulfilling industries I could be part of.

What is your favourite game?

I’ll give you three: Dragon Age Inquisition, The Sims 2, and Baldur’s Gate 3


Kayla Panozzo

Tell us about your job:

At Riot Games Sydney, I manage a team of ~7 developers who create exciting new features for Valorant. Most of my job is making their lives as easy as possible. Normally that is brainstorming ways to solve hard technical problems, pushing for product decision to be made in meetings and sometimes even writing code. I just love being able to enable game developers to create their best work and work closely with the US Valorant teams to make it the best game for players that it can be.

One part of my job I enjoy is solving hard problems. The games industry provides very unique but challenging problems – everything has to scale to millions of concurrent users and sometimes thing are very subjective (e.g. something just doesn’t feel right). This means that I am always faced with new challenges to try and solve and it keeps life interesting. On top of that people management adds another level of complexity to my work. Everybody has different experiences and react to different scenarios in unique ways. Working through this with people and helping people grow is very rewarding. I really want everyone to enjoy their job and be the best they can be and I am privileged to help people do that everyday.

Why Games?

Games are a great way to make new friends, be creative or help you get through a hard time. I love being able to make something that is such a big part of people’s lives and games have helped me many times when I just needed to escape from the hardships that life throws your way. On top of that, games have always been a big part of my life – it was a way for me to connect with my family and friends. As a child, at every family barbeque you could find me and my cousins playing Spyro, Kingdom Hearts, Crash Bash or Guitar Hero. Now that I work in games, I pretty much live, breathe and sleep games. I play Valorant at work, cozy games after work and then cooperative games on the weekend with friends. So once I left the finance industry and was looking for a different industry to move to, games was the obvious choice and I was just luckily enough to join the Australian games industry. I am very excited to see the industry grow so that more people have the chance to join us.

What is your favourite game?

Spyro 2: Gateway To Glimmer


Kirsty Parkin

Tell us about your job:

I run Supaglu, an employment agency specifically for the games, VFX and animation industry in Australia. Together with my amazing team, I work to help our studio clients find the best Australian talent, with the right skills and experience, to help them complete their projects and build their businesses. We work with studios all over Australia, and find freelance and permanent/contract staff. For example, we find work for experienced 2D and 3D artists, tech and VFX artists, production staff, developers and engineers, game designers and also associated support roles like marketing people and business development leads. We also work in “games adjacent’ industries – industries that might need the skills of people with a game development background. We also spend as much time as we can giving to the industry – attending and sponsoring events, and working to improve things for everyone as much as possible.

Why Games?

I’ve been playing games since the late 1980s. Our family bought a Commodore 128, and my brother got given a game called The Bard’s Tale. I was transfixed – there was, finally, a cartoon you could play, even if you had to type each command! I have never stopped playing RPGs, and later MMORPGS in all their various forms. I’ve worked in training, education and talent acquisition for many years – first in advertising and design in the 00’s, then in games and VFX in the teens. When I was a girl, I never believed it would be possible to work in the games industry. We’ve come a long way.

What is your favourite game?

Breath of the Wild. And also World of Warcraft, back in the day 🙂 And also all the Civilizations.


Kathy Smart

Tell us about your job:

Part of having a creative career is living with financial ups and downs. At present I teach part-time at SAE Creative Media Institute to fund my studio. I really enjoy supporting students as they grow so amazingly in their own creative lives, but I am always wanting to get back to making my own games.

When I am in my home studio I have to spend a disproportionate amount of time on admin, because social media and BAS statements still exist even for studios marking time while they build up capital.

My production work right now involves liaising with one totally blind QA tester in the US and another in Poland and one programmer working remotely, while we make my current game more accessible to players.

My creative work is when I have the best time, making small improvements to scenes in my current game in Unity. I get lost to the world, making sprites move, rotate and change size or colour, then saving the changes one way, checking them, saving them another way, checking them, and, you guessed it, building the game and checking them again. I work on characters, props, background cut-outs, UI buttons, sound, text, and menu settings. My next patch will be a big one. It will look much the same to players but will incorporate thousands of small changes.

I also attend Adelaide game developer events, which are bigger every year. We have the support of IGEA which has completely changed the landscape for game developers in Australia. I speak to so many indies who are aiming for ScreenAustralia funding, brought about by IGEA lobbying. I personally have used IGEA contract templates, and I benefited from IGEA mentoring.
So… back to the job!

Why Games?

I have a Masters in Creative Writing and I have written stories all my life. I have also played games all my life. I used to organise children’s parties, I have attended bridge tournaments, I was in the school chess club, my whole teen social set thrived on board games, I played Carmen Sandiago then Halo with the kids, and I had to take Microsoft games off my PC because I was playing them too much. However I had never thought to combine my two passions until I attended a seminar by Professor Christy Dena whom WritersSA brought down from Brisbane. Dr Dena showed us the powerful emotions that games can elicit and I was overwhelmed with ideas. I signed up to study game design at AIE and I’ve never looked back.

What is your favourite game?

My own game, of course! Frog’s Princess.


Jhenne Tyler

Tell us about your job:

A typical day for me involves lots of reading, even more writing, and thankfully not too much arithmetic (though I’ve fallen into the habit of creating lots of character and plot tracking timelines for future-me to reference.)

I’ve always enjoyed doing a little bit of everything when it comes to creative pursuits, and narrative design (especially at a studio of this size) is divinely aligned with my attention span. There’s a little of everything! One day could involve developing quests, character arcs, and penning dialogue, the next might focus on item descriptions, flavor text, and barks, or sitting in on and assisting with VO sessions, or clarifying in-script wordplay and puns for localization, or a million other micro-adventures.

Inter-team communication and collaboration is a constant; I ping-pong between the studio’s art, animation, and marketing peeps the most, and remain armed with plenty of moodboards for the ultimate visual learner vibe curation/story conveyance. (Sometimes, I end up simply marveling at the art– I file these moments under “inspiration-finding and brainstorming”.) After a successful outfit dubbing endeavor, I have also been giving the hilariously vague-yet-distinct task of “naming things”; if an in-game item needs a cute n’ cozy moniker, I’m your gal.

Basically, narrative design means donning whatever storytelling hat helps bring our game to life!

Why Games?

Naturally I grew up playing all manner of games (shoutout Super Mario 64 and my much beloved elementary school Oregon Trail days) but I slid into the gaming industry somewhat sideways; freelance TTRPG writing gigs and phone storage weighed down with mobile games turned into me wondering if my fav episodic story game was hiring. They were; I applied by harnessing the delicate balance of a serious business word-nerd résumé and a dorkily effusive cover letter promising curated ship playlists and a commitment to making players wail and/or squee as necessary, and ended up landing the position!

It’s a fantastic ride. I have a degree in Media Studies and had gotten used to looking at the medium from an analytical, academic perspective, so going from player to creator has been such a fun and fascinating experience. I’m grateful to have the chance to move the needle forward in terms of representation– I want to center stories and people that aren’t often under the spotlight– things I’d personally always hoped to see not just included, but highlighted and treated with care.

What is your favourite game?

Heavenly Sword (2007)


Megan Vasudevan

Tell us about your job:

As Marketing Coordinator, I oversee the SEO and Website Analytics for our brand. I also look into industry trends and news such as potential events to attend or people to connect with. On another note, I populate the website with blogs and infographics on game-related content. On a day-to-day basis, I shuffle between analytics, researching blog topics, making posts for social media, curating the monthly newsletter or any other work that comes across my desk.

Why Games?

This is my first job in the games industry, I was hired straight out of uni after finishing a master’s in marketing degree. I have always loved digital games starting very early on playing Pokemon on the Gameboy Advanced. Being able to work in the industry has given me a much broader perspective on what goes into games and the variety there is!

What is your favourite game?

Pokemon Emerald


Camille Woodthorpe

Tell us about your job:

As a (usually) solo developer I’ll wear many hats of game development – from programming, to art, to design, to marketing, and even some audio. Despite being experienced in managing Agile development teams, my own game projects are managed with simple priorities. Most of my day is comprised of doing hands-on development and programming in Unity or making pixel art in Aseprite. Being a solo developer is challenging in that the responsibility and ownership falls entirely on yourself, but that is also where you can take immense joy from your creations and where you take them!

Why Games?

I grew up playing games a lot with my 3 brothers, and was very creative from a young age – first, writing my own stories, then making pixel art in Microsoft Paint, then learnt Photoshop to do a lot of editing, all whilst playing and being inspired by games. Games was the perfect medium to practise all these areas of my creativity in the one place, in a medium which I loved. So I studied game development at Uni and have been doing it ever since.

What is your favourite game?

Tough question – maybe Pokemon Red on Gameboy or Zelda Oracle of Seasons


 

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